A Grammar of the Latin Language: For the Use of Schools and Colleges

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Crocker and Brewster, 1847 - Latin language - 323 pages
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Page 305 - XVIII XVII XVI XV XIV XIII XII XI X IX VIII VII VI v IV III...
Page 180 - If the substantives be of different persons, the verb plural must agree with the first person rather than the second, and with the second rather than the third ; as...
Page 63 - ... thirty, forty, fifty, sixty, seventy, eighty, ninety, a hundred, a hundred and one, two hundred, three hundred, four hundred, five hundred, six hundred, seven hundred, eight hundred, nine hundred, a thousand.
Page 194 - The name of the town at or in which any thing is said to be or to be done, if of the first or second declension and singular number, is put in the genitive ; if of the third declension or plural number, it is put in the ablative.
Page 166 - Adjectives, adjective pronouns, and participles, agree with their nouns in gender, number, and case; as, Bonus vir, A good man.
Page 181 - A noun in the predicate, after a verb neuter or passive, is put in the same case as the subject, when it denotes the same person or thing ; as, Ira furor brevis est, Anger is a short madness.
Page 16 - DECLENSION. 1 . Nouns of the neuter gender have the Accusative and Vocative like the Nominative, in both numbers ; and these cases in the plural end always in a. 2. The Dative and Ablative plural end always alike.
Page 85 - The subjunctive mood is that form of the verb which is used to express an action or state simply as conceived by the mind ; as, si me obsgcret, redibo ; if he entreat me, I will return.

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