A Grammar of the Persian Language: To which is Added, a Selection of Easy Extracts for Reading, Together with a Vocabulary, and Translations

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W.H. Allen & Company, 1869 - Persian language - 238 pages
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Page 165 - And when his disciples, James and John, saw this, they said ; Lord, wilt thou that we command fire to come down from heaven, and consume them, even as Elias did ? But he turned and rebuked them, and said ; Ye know not what manner of spirit ye are of. For the Son of man is not come to destroy men's lives, but to save them.
Page 167 - When Abraham sat at his tent door, according to his custom, waiting to entertain strangers, he espied an old man, stooping and leaning on his staff, weary with age and travel, coming towards him, who was an hundred years of age. He received him kindly, washed his feet, provided supper, caused him to sit down; but observing that the old man...
Page 165 - is weak in the faith, receive you, but not to
Page 156 - Behind him cast ; the broad circumference Hung on his shoulders like the moon, whose orb Through optic glass the Tuscan artist views At evening from the top of Fesole Or in Valdarno, to descry new lands, Rivers, or mountains, in her spotty globe.
Page 164 - And when Abraham saw that the man blessed not God, he said unto him, Wherefore dost thou not worship the most high God, creator of heaven and earth ? 7.
Page 164 - And Abraham answered and said, "Lord he would not worship thee, neither would he call upon thy name; therefore have I driven him out from before my face into the wilderness.
Page 167 - ... asked him why he did not worship the God of heaven. The old man told him, that he worshipped the fire only, and acknowledged no other God. At which answer Abraham grew so zealously...
Page 73 - We see. by this letter, that the love of conquest was but the second ambition in Alexander's soul. Knowledge is, indeed, that which, next to virtue, truly and essentially raises one man above another. It finishes one half of the human soul. It makes being pleasant to us, fills the mind with entertaining views, and administers to it a perpetual series. of gratifications. It gives ease to solitude, and gracefulness to retirement. It fills a public station with suitable abilities, and adds a lustre...
Page 167 - I have suffered him these hundred years, although he dishonoured me; and couldst not thou endure him one night, when he gave thee no trouble ?' Upon this" saith the story, " Abraham fetched him back again, and gave him hospitable entertainment and wise instruction." Go thou and do likewise, and thy charity will be rewarded by the God of Abraham.
Page 164 - And Abraham arose and met him, and said unto him: "Turn in, I pray thee, and wash thy feet, and tarry all night, and thou shalt arise early on the morrow, and go on thy way.

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