A guide to all the watering and sea-bathing places; with a description of the lakes; a sketch of a tour in Wales; and itineraries, by the editor of The picture of London

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Page 228 - tis, to cast one's eyes so low ! The crows, and choughs, that wing the midway air, Show scarce so gross as beetles: Halfway down Hangs one that gathers samphire ; dreadful trade ! Methinks, he seems no bigger than his head : The fishermen, that walk upon the beach, Appear like mice ; and yon...
Page 114 - Take, holy earth ! all that my soul holds dear: Take that best gift which Heaven so lately gave : To Bristol's fount I bore with trembling care Her faded form : she bow'd to taste the wave, And died.
Page 114 - Even from the grave thou shalt have power to charm. Bid them be chaste, be innocent, like thee; Bid them in Duty's sphere as meekly move; And if so fair, from vanity as free; As firm in friendship, and as fond in love. Tell them...
Page 53 - Cold is that hand, which living was stretch'd forth, At friendship's call, to succour modest worth. Here lies James Quin — deign reader to be taught, Whate'er thy strength of body, force of thought, In Nature's happiest mould...
Page 28 - If social virtues make remembrance dear, Or manners pure on decent rule depend; To His remains consign one grateful tear, Of youth the Guardian, and of all the Friend. Now sleeps Dominion; here no Beauty flows. Nor more avails the festive scene to grace. Beneath that hand which no discernment shows, Untaught to honour, or distinguish place.
Page 98 - Which glorious act of his for Church and State, Eight princes in one day did gratulate — Professing all to him in debt to bee, As all the world are to his memory. Since earth could not reward the worth him given, He now receives it from the King of Heaven. In the same chest one jewel more you have, The partner of his virtues, bed, and grave.
Page 228 - tis to cast one's eyes so low ! The crows, and choughs, that wing the midway air, Show scarce so gross as beetles. Half way down Hangs one that gathers samphire ; dreadful trade ! Methinks he seems no bigger than his head. The fishermen, that walk upon the beach, Appear like mice ; and yon' tall, anchoring bark, Diminished to her cock ; her cock, a buoy Almost too small for sight.
Page 25 - That ladies coming to the ball appoint a time for their footmen coming to wait on them home, to prevent disturbance and inconveniences to themselves and others.
Page 268 - Yet time has seen, that lifts the low, And level lays the lofty brow, Has seen this broken pile complete, Big with the vanity of state ; But transient is the smile of fate ! A little rule, a little sway, A sunbeam in a winter's day, Is all the proud and mighty have Between the cradle and the grave.
Page 115 - Shall dare invade thee in this hallow'd place ; Nor while he sails the liquid air along, Check the shrill numbers of thy cheerful song. No cautious gunner, whose unerring sight Stops the swift eagle in his rapid flight, Shall here disturb my lovely songster's rest, Nor wound the plumage of his crimson breast.

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