A Guide to Sanitary House-inspection: Or, Hints and Helps Regarding the Choice of a Healthful Home in City Or Country

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Wiley, 1885 - Hygiene - 145 pages
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Contents

I
8
II
14
III
19
IV
22
V
90
VI
95
VII
99
VIII
132
IX
134
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Page 14 - We forget that old proverb, that an ounce of prevention is better than a pound of cure, — that that is the truest wisdom which advises the overcoming of the beginnings of evil.
Page 81 - ... that men were larger and stronger on the average in old times, is to yield to the old fallacy of fancying that savages were peculiarly healthy, because those who were seen were active and strong. The simple answer is, that the strong alone survived, while the majority died from the severity of the training.
Page 81 - I must answer that, begging their pardons, our ancestors did nothing of the kind. Our ancestors got on usually very ill in these matters : and when they got on well, it was because they had good ventilation in spite of themselves. First, They got on very ill. To quote a few remarkable instances of longevity, or to tell me that men were larger and stronger on the average in old times, is to yield to the old fallacy of fancying that savages were peculiarly healthy, because those who were seen were...
Page 83 - I can testify from long experience, is as thoroughly ventilating as living in a lantern with the horn broken out. It was because their houses were full of draughts, and, still more in the early middle age, because they had no glass, and stopped out the air only by a shutter at night, that they sought for shelter rather than for fresh air, of which they sometimes had too much ; and, to escape the wind, built their houses in holes, such as that in which the old city of Winchester stands. Shelter, I...
Page 84 - We have plate-glass instead of lattices ; and we have replaced the draughty and smoky, but really wholesome open chimney, with its wide corners and settles, by narrow registers, and even by stoves. We have done all we can, in fact, to seal ourselves up hermetically from the outer air, and to breathe our own breaths over and over again; and we pay the penalty of it in a thousand ways unknown to our ancestors, through whose rooms all the winds of heaven whistled, and who were glad enough to shelter...
Page 1 - A Guide to Sanitary House Inspection ; or, Hints and Helps regarding the Choice of a Healthful Home in City or Country.
Page 82 - I have no hesitation in saying that the average of disease and death was far greater then than it is now. Epidemics of many kinds, typhus, ague, plague — all diseases which were caused more or less by bad air, devastated this land and Europe in those days with a horrible intensity, to which even the choleras of our times are mild. The back streets, the hospitals, the...
Page 82 - ... and Europe in those days with a horrible intensity, to which even the choleras of our times are mild. The back streets, the hospitals, the gaols, the barracks, the camps — every place in which any large number of persons congregated, were so many nests of pestilence, engendered by uncleanliness, which defiled alike the water which was drunk and the air which was breathed; and as a single fact, of which the tables of insurance companies assure us, the average of human life in England has increased...
Page 103 - In this matter of choice of location, it must constantly be borne in mind, that, while defective construction may generally be remedied, unhealthy surroundings, an undesirable aspect, or insalubrious building-site cannot be changed.
Page 22 - It must present no facilities for holding dust or the poisonous particles of disease. "2. It must possess every facility for the removal of its impurities as fast as they are produced. " 3. It must be free from damp. "4. It must be well filled with daylight, from all points that can be charged with light from the sun, without glare. "5. It must be charged with perfectly pure air in steady, changing currents.

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