A guide to the following watering and sea-bathing places; namely Blackpool, Bridlington [ &c. Wanting pp. 1-10].

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 30 - Knight, fer forty poor persons, viz. ten poor men, the same number of poor women, ten boys, and ten girls, who are provided, in a comfortable manner, with all the necessaries of life ; and the children, after being properly instructed in reading, writing, and arithmetic, with other branches of a useful education, are put out apprentices. A sum of money was also bequeathed by John Turner, Esq. serjeant at law, for clothing each of the children on leaving the hospital. Sir Charles Turner is the sole...
Page 31 - In the centre of the front is a small chapel, thirty-five feet in length by thirty-three feet in breadth, finished in a style of superior elegance. The roof is arched in compartments, and supported by four light and handsome columns of the Ionic order ; from the centre hangs a large chandelier of burnished gold, and over the altar is a window of painted glass, esteemed one of the finest in the world, representing the offerings of the Magi at the Nativity of Christ. On one side is a full length figure...
Page 14 - The view of Flamborough Head and the bay, particularly when the coasting vessels are detained here by contrary winds, affords a delightful prospect ; and in a moonlight evening, the silent heaving of the waves, the lights of the distant ships, and the long train of radiant reflection thrown by the moon over the vast expanse of water, render it a most enchanting scene, and raise the mind to the noblest contemplations.
Page 24 - Coitmofs, near Buxton. The entrance is by a fmall arch, fo very low, that fuch as venture into it are forced to creep upon their hands and knees, but it gradually opens into a vault more than a quarter of a mile i. (.' • 1 long, and, as Come have pretended, a quarter of a mile high. It is certainly very lofty, and locks not unlike the infide of a Gothic cathedral.
Page 25 - Scots pillar, becaufe it is faid (he went in fo far, and beyond it there is a ftecp afcent, for near a quarter of a mile, which terminates in a hollow in the roof, called the Needle's Eye, in which, when the guide places his candle, it looks like a ftar in the firmament. If a piftol is fired near the Queen's Pillar, the report will be as loud as a cannon.
Page 24 - Come have pretended, a quarter of a mile high. It is certainly very lofty, and locks not unlike the infide of a Gothic cathedral. In a cavern to the right, called Pool's chamber, there is a fine echo, though it does not appear of what kind it .is; and a found of a current of water, which runs along the middle of the great vault, being reverberated on each fide, very much encreafes...
Page 32 - Harold, be sent him to subdue the northern parts of this realm ; and, rewarded him with no less than forty-three lordships, in the east and west ridings of Yorkshire, and fifty-one in the north riding of that county ; whereof,' the manor and castle of Skelton, in Cleveland, were the capital of his barony. In the third of king Stephen, he and his son Adam, with all the force they could raise, joined the northern barons, at North-Allerton...
Page 34 - ... of Irthing, which here contracts into a deep glen ; the impetuous river flowing between stupendous banks of fantastic rock, beautifully wooded, and pursuing a course of whimsical irregularity. The spring which attracts the company to this sequestered...
Page 40 - Hutchinson, vol 3. p. 25) in this kingdom give the traveller so perfect an idea of the fortifications of former times as Hartlepool : a long extended wall strengthened by demi-bastions at intervals, some rounded, others square ; various...
Page 35 - The spring which attracts the company to this sequestered and desolate spot is near the upper house; it is strongly impregnated with sulphur, but extremely agreeable to the palate : its effects in cutaneous disorders are powerfully good. At a small distance, on the moor, is a chalybeate spring ; and another four miles distant, highly charged with alum and vitriol.

Bibliographic information