A Guide to the National Parks of America

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R. McBride, 1918 - Canada - 338 pages
 

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Page 327 - Fishing with nets, seines, traps, or by the use of drugs or explosives, or in any other way than with hook and line, is prohibited. Fishing for purposes of merchandise or profit is forbidden. Fishing may be prohibited by order of the superintendent...
Page 331 - May 7, 1894: 1. It is forbidden to remove or injure the sediments or incrustations around the geysers, hot springs, or steam vents; or to deface the same by written...
Page 333 - SEC. 3. That permits for the examination of ruins, the excavation of archaeological sites, and the gathering of objects of antiquity upon the lands under their respective jurisdictions, may be granted by the Secretaries of the Interior, Agriculture, and War, to institutions which they may deem...
Page 155 - ... sight of luxuriant Engelmann spruces creeping closely upon the ground instead of rising a hundred and fifty feet or more straight and true as masts arouses keenest interest. Many trees which defy the winter gales grow bent in half circles. Others, starting straight in shelter of some large rock, bend at right angles where they emerge above the rock. Others which have succeeded in lifting their heads in spite of...
Page 311 - The tower is a steep-sided shaft rising 600 feet above a rounded ridge of sedimentary rocks, about 600 feet high, on the west bank of the Belle Fourche River. Its nearly flat top is elliptical in outline, with a diameter varying from 60 to 100 feet. Its sides are strongly fluted by the great columns of igneous rock, and are nearly perpendicular, except near the top, where there is some rounding, and near the bottom, where there is considerable outward flare. The...
Page 313 - THIS area, near Grand Junction, Colorado, is similar to that of the Garden of the Gods at Colorado Springs, only much more beautiful and picturesque. With possibly two exceptions it exhibits probably as highly colored, magnificent, and impressive examples of erosion, particularly of lofty monoliths, as may be found anywhere in the West. These monoliths are located in several tributary canyons. Some of them are of gigantic size; one over four hundred feet high is almost circular and a hundred feet...
Page 154 - ... give place to low birches, which, in their turn, give place to small piney growths, and finally to tough straggling grass, hardy mosses, and tiny Alpine flowers. Grass grows in sheltered spots even on the highest peaks, which is fortunate for the large curve-horned mountain sheep which seek these high, open places to escape their special enemies, the mountain lions. Even at the highest altitudes gorgeously colored wild flowers grow in glory and profusion in sheltered gorges.
Page 330 - Freight, baggage, and heavy camping outfits on sidehill grades throughout the park will take the outer side of the road while being passed by passenger vehicles in either direction.
Page 321 - The outside dimensions of the church ruins, which is in the form of a short-arm cross, are about 48 by 140 feet, and its walls are from 4 to 6 feet thick and from 12 to 20 feet high.
Page 112 - the headwaters of the Tuolumne and Merced Rivers, two of the most songful streams in the world; innumerable lakes and waterfalls and smooth silky lawns; the noblest forests, the loftiest granite domes, the deepest ice-sculptured canyons, the brightest crystalline pavements, and snowy mountains soaring into the sky twelve and thirteen thousand feet...

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