A Handbook of Public Speaking

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Harcourt, Brace, 1922 - Oratory - 165 pages
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OCLC: 2637270
Related Subjects: Oratory. | Public speaking.
LCCN:PN

Contents

I
3
II
8
III
14
IV
22
V
30
VI
38
VII
45
VIII
53
IX
61
X
70
XI
75
XII
87
XIII
97
XIV
110
XV
117
Copyright

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Page 21 - So, naturalists observe, a flea Has smaller fleas that on him prey; And- these have smaller still to bite 'em, And so proceed ad infinitum.
Page 18 - Party today is committed to massive increases in taxation for all - rich and poor alike - not simply as a means to an end. but as an end in itself.
Page 30 - During all this time, however, note that it is not an identical object in the psychological sense, but a succession of mutually related objects forming an identical topic only, upon which the attention is fixed. No one can possibly attend continuously to an object that does not change.
Page 67 - Socrates' proposition: all men are mortal, I am a man, therefore I am mortal.
Page 5 - ... life, but is not life, and is considered best when it is not too much like life; and this is true of all the Fine Arts. But in public speaking we have something very different. We have, not a conventionalized imitation of life, but life itself, a natural function of life, a real human being in real communication with his fellows; and it is best when it is most real.
Page v - THE purpose of this book is to furnish the student of public speaking with a concise statement of the principles he ought to know, together with a few hints as to method.
Page 74 - Drift is not a matter of retrospect; it is something the listener wants to feel every minute of the time. Though hard to define, it is easy to feel — when it is there. When it is not, everybody squirms and murmurs, 'What is he driving at?
Page 103 - Insufficient lung capacity, due usually to neglect of the habit of deep breathing. b. Breathlessness, due to the habit of speaking with the lungs nearly empty, and no breath reserve. c. Inadequate control of breath, due usually to some form of constriction that has resulted in a cramped habit of breathing. d. Fluttering, or temporary loss of control, due to nervousness.
Page 46 - Distraction is primary attention gone wrong. The listener finds his attention engaged by stimuli coming from sources other than the speaker — sometimes from within himself and sometimes from without. Occasionally the stimuli even come from the speaker, but from the wrong part of him — his hands or feet, for instance, instead of his brain.

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