A handbook of the destructive insects of Victoria: with notes on the methods to be adopted to check and extirpate them

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Page 13 - Act ; and all such rules shall be laid before both Houses of Parliament within fourteen days after the making thereof, if Parliament be sitting, and if Parliament be not sitting, then within fourteen days after the next meeting of Parliament...
Page 208 - Fig. 8) to avoid spilling the liquid ; also more runners. The oil may be used alone so as to just cover the bottom, or on the surface of water, and the insects strained through a wire ladle. When the insects are very small, one may economize in kerosene by lining the pan with saturated cloth j but this becomes less efficient afterward, and frames .of cloth saturated with oil do not equal the pans.
Page 207 - It also permits the use of the simplest kind of pan. Enough tar is spread over whatever receptacle may be used to cover well the bottom, and when this becomes sufficiently matted with the young locusts so as no longer to destroy the new comers, another coating is added, and so on until it becomes necessary to remove the whole mass, when it is shoveled from the pan and burned ; or, what is far preferable, wherever there are wet ditches, it may be thrown into these, when the oil contained in it...
Page 209 - VI represents this machine in operation. The air current made by the revolving fan creates a suction at the mouth, which draws the insects up the tubes and into the chamber. They are then thrown by the fan upon a wire screen, and from thence drop into a kind of hopper which conducts them to a bag. The wire screen rapidly chokes up and must be frequently cleaned. Most of the locusts are crushed and mangled by the rapidly revolving fan, so that the screen may be removed entirely and the locusts thrown...
Page 207 - It was found to do very good service, killing the yonng locusts in considerable numbers. The oil did not evaporate so rapidly as was anticipated. One thorough saturation was sufficient for fifteen or twenty minutes, when a little more could be added. If the machine be hauled against the wind, nearly all the locusts which hop will touch the oiled canvas. They generally take several hops upon the canvas before leaving it, thus insuring a thorough saturation with the oil. After hopping from the apron...
Page 208 - A good and cheap pan is made of ordinary sheet iron, 8 feet long, 11 inches wide at the bottom, and turned up a foot high at the back and an inch high at the front. A runner at each end, extending some distance behind, and a cord attached to each front corner complete the pan at a cost of about 6s.
Page 206 - A strip of leather closes the slit through which the cut-oif slips, and the main bag is made of dark cloth, while the secondary bag is white, so as by contrast to attract more thoroughly the locusts. " The advantages of this machine are that it requires no additional expense to run it, as for oil, tar, &.c. It will catch the winged locust as well as the young, if operated on cool mornings and evenings, and is adapted to almost all conditions of growing grain. The machine can be made for about $10,...
Page 210 - ... working of the machine, as, by the time it was perfected, simpler and satisfactory methods were extensively being employed in Minnesota, and the inventor did not feel encouraged to manufacture his machine. Indeed, its expense is too great to warrant its manufacture, except to order by clubs of farmers. To use Mr. Peteler's own words: "This machine is intended for local or State authorities to use on uncultivated lands adjoining farms and unsettled prairies, in order to destroy the insects during...
Page 205 - From the lower side of this wing are suspended a number of teeth or beater, which, swinging loosely, drive the locusts inward. The machine is handled by means of two ropes hitched to the outer runners or to the outer and lower side of the mouth of the frame.
Page 133 - Stretched out on this network, the larva which is now 2.6 mm. long, makes a small hole in it near its edge, then, as one would turn a somersault, the larva puts its head into this hole and draws its body after. Arriving inside the "molting cocoon" as it may be termed, on its back and doubled in the shape of a horse-shoe, the larva is then ready to strengthen the cocoon and close the opening which it made in entering. The larvae make...

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