A Higher English Grammar

Front Cover
Longmans, Green, and Company, 1891 - 358 pages
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Contents

Two Sentences united by a connecting word The Conjunction
13
THE PARTS OP SPEECH THE NOUN 13 Definition of the Noun
14
Common General Significant Nouns
15
The Noun sometimes completes the Predicate ib 16 The Noun is used in forming Prepositional Phrases
16
The Noun frequently acts as an Adjective ib Substitutes for the Noun
17
Singular Objects with Significant Names
18
Class Names are General and Significant ib 8 III Collective Nouns
19
The Infinitive of the Verb is substantially a Noun
20
Abstract Nouns
21
Abstract Nouns mostly derived from Adjectives ib 12 Other Abstract Nouns formed from Verbs
25
Classes of PronounsI The Personal ib 3 II Demonstrative
26
Meaning of It
27
1 Backward or Retrospective Reference of it ib 2 Forward or Anticipative Reference ib 3 The Vague or Indefinite Reference
28
Further general examples of the uses of it
29
They
30
They One
31
Reflexive Pronouns by means of self 82
33
A Relative Pronoun involves the power of a conjunc tion
34
Who is best applied as co ordinating ib Who is frequently used as restrictive
35
Which is similarly employed ib Which may refer to a whole statement
36
What and its compounds
38
whoever whoso c 4C 30 Further examples of Relative Construction
41
Meaning of Case 133
43
The Pronoun saves the repetition of a Noun Other modes of serving the same end
47
The Adjective Inflexion as a distinguishing mark
48
Classes of AdjectivesI Pronominal ib 45 Pronominal Demonstrative Adjectives
49
Pronominal Interrogative Adjectives
50
Pronominal Relative Adjectives
51
Adjectives expressing Quantity
52
Quantity in NumberDefinite Numeral Adjectives ib 12 Indefinite Numeral Adjectives
53
Distributive Numeral Adjectives
55
Adjectives of Quality
56
The Articles 16 17 An or A
57
TheIts various meanings
58
Substitutes for the Adjective 19 The fullest equivalent is the Adjective Clause
60
The Participial Phrase if shorter is equally useful ib 21 The Prepositional Phrase is still more condensed ib 22 The Noun employed as an Adjective ib ...
61
Coordinating or Predicate Adjectives 25 The Adjective as complement of Incomplete Verb
62
THE VERB 1 The Verb necessary to Predication
63
Classes of VerbsI Transitive Reflexive ib Reciprocal Verbs
64
Incomplete Apposition or Copula Verbs
65
Adverbs of Manner transferred to express Degree
75
Of Its meanings
83

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Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 183 - Now if Christ be preached that he rose from the dead, how say some among you that there is no resurrection of the dead?
Page 88 - Yes, to smell pork ; to eat of the habitation which your prophet the Nazarite conjured the devil into. I will buy with you, sell with you, talk with you, walk with you, and so following ; but I will not eat with you, drink with you, nor pray with you.
Page 344 - Let the elders that rule well be counted worthy of double honour, especially they who labour in the word and doctrine.
Page 45 - Before all temples the upright heart and pure, Instruct me, for thou know'st; thou from the first Wast present, and, with mighty wings outspread, Dove-like, sat'st brooding on the vast abyss, And mad'st it pregnant: what in me is dark Illumine; what is low, raise and support...
Page 46 - I love them that love me, and they that seek me early shall find me'; 'they that are whole have no need of a physician'; 'how sweet is the rest of them that labor!
Page 321 - Men look with an evil eye upon the good that is in others, and think that their reputation obscures them, and their commendable qualities stand in their light ; and therefore they do what they can to cast a cloud over them, that the bright shining of their virtues may not obscure them.
Page 183 - But if there be no resurrection of the dead, then is Christ not risen. And if Christ be not risen, then is our preaching vain, and your faith is also vain.
Page 345 - There are few words in the English language which are employed in a more loose and uncircumscribed sense than those of the fancy and the imagination.
Page 282 - Tis as the general pulse Of life stood still, and Nature made a pause ; An awful pause! prophetic of her end.
Page 30 - I am sure sincerity is better; for why does any man dissemble, or seem to be that which he is not, but because he thinks it good to have such a quality as he pretends to? for to counterfeit and dissemble is to put on the appearance of some real excellency.

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