A History of British Fishes, Volume 2

Front Cover
Hardwicke and Bogue, 1876 - Fishes - 136 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 161 - ... ocean. It is divided into distinct columns of five or six miles in length and three or four in breadth, and they drive the water before them with a kind of rippling...
Page 165 - The size of the boat used depends on the distance from shore at which the fishery is carried on ; but, whether in deep or in shallow water, the nets are only in actual use during the night. It is found that the fish strike the nets in much greater numbers when it is dark than...
Page 136 - I think it possible, when trout feed much on hard substances, such as larvae and their cases, and the ova of other fish, they have more red spots, and redder fins. This is the case with the gillaroo and the char, who feed on analogous substances : and the trout, that have similar habits, might be expected to resemble them. When trout feed...
Page 34 - ... Europe) belongs, have during this period not only been increased, but entirely remodelled. The amusement and instruction derived from such institutions, call to our minds, with deep feelings of gratitude, that they are the work of that great monarch, who modestly and in simple grandeur, adorns every year this royal city with new treasures of nature and art ; and what is of still greater value than the treasures themselves, —what inspires every Prussian with youthful strength, and with an enthusiastic...
Page 108 - But it must not be supposed they have the power of elevating themselves in the air, after having left their native...
Page 62 - Persons were accordingly employed ; and almost choked up by weeds and mud, so little water remained, that no person expected to see any fish, except a few Eels, yet nearly two hundred brace of Tench of all sizes, and as many Perch, were found. After the pond was thought to be quite free, under some roots there seemed to be an animal which was conjectured to be an otter ; the place was surrounded...
Page 95 - I spake to you formerly, that keeps tame Otters, that he hath known a Pike in extreme hunger, fight with one of his Otters for a Carp that the Otter had caught, and was then bringing out of the water.
Page 184 - ... baits in fishing ; the liver, which is large and good for eating, also furnishes an enormous quantity of oil, which is an excellent substitute for that of the whale, and applicable to all the same purposes ; the swimming-bladder furnishes an isinglass not inferior to that yielded by the sturgeon ; the head, in the places where the cod is taken, supplies the fishermen and their families with food. The Norwegians give it with marine plants to their cows, for the purpose of producing a greater proportion...
Page 63 - ... or vermilion. This extraordinary fish, after having been inspected by many gentlemen, was carefully put into a pond, and at the time the account was written, twelve months afterwards, was alive and well...
Page 100 - Pike is cut off the spit ; or to give the sauce a haut-gout, let the dish into which you let the Pike fall, be rubbed with it : The using or not using of this garlick is left to your discretion. MB This dish of meat is too good for any but Anglers, or very honest men ; and I trust, you will prove both, and therefore I have trusted you with this secret.

Bibliographic information