A History of Jamaica from Its Discovery by Christopher Columbus to the Present Time: Including an Account of Its Trade and Agriculture; Sketches of the Manners, Habits, and Customs of All Classes of Its Inhabitants; and a Narrative of the Progress of Religion and Education in the Island

Front Cover
E. Stock, 1873 - Agriculture - 512 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 258 - 2. That, through a determined and persevering, but at the same time judicious and temperate enforcement of such measures, this House looks forward to a progressive improvement in the character of the slave population, such as may prepare them for a participation in those civil rights and privileges which are enjoyed by other classes of His Majesty's subjects.
Page 144 - We cannot allow the colonies to check, or discourage in any degree, a traffic so beneficial to the nation.
Page 88 - Army, we can not only bewail the same, but desire that all with you may do so ; and that a very special regard may be had so to govern, for time to come, as that all manner of vice may be thoroughly discountenanced, and severely punished ; and that such a frame of government may be exercised that virtue and godliness may receive due encouragement.
Page 34 - We have done the like to the Windward English Islands ; and both in England and Scotland and Ireland, you will have what men and women we can well transport.
Page 401 - ... such as may be necessary to preserve inviolate the faith of the island with the public creditor...
Page 173 - Jewish (economics, these differ'd little from the wife, except in some outward ceremonies and stipulations, but agreed with her in all the true essences of marriage, and gave themselves up to the husband (for so he is called), with faith plighted, with sentiments, and with affection. Such a one the...
Page 278 - Trelawny, and we do sincerely hope that the bodies of all the Methodist preachers who may be convicted of sedition may diversify the scene. After this our hostility, even to men so reckless of blood, carnage, and slaughter, shall cease.
Page 400 - George 3rd c. 12 ; that the same has not, and ought not to have, the force of law in this island, and that the authorities will not be justified in acting on...
Page 208 - In regard to the general character of the man, he was haughty, opinionated, looked down with sovereign contempt on his fellow Blacks, entertained the highest opinion of his own knowledge, treated his parents with much disdain, and behaved towards his children and his...
Page 98 - After they are whipped till they are raw, some put on their skins pepper and salt to make them smart ; at other times their masters will drop melted wax on their skins, and use several very exquisite torments.

Bibliographic information