A History of Livingston County, New York: From Its Earliest Traditions, to Its Part in the War for Our Union : with an Account of the Seneca Nation of Indians, and Biographical Sketches of Earliest Settlers and Prominent Public Men

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Edward L. Doty, 1876 - Livingston County (N.Y.) - 685 pages
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Contents

I
xxv
II
23
III
53
IV
90
V
124
VI
137
VII
193
VIII
225
X
266
XI
295
XII
323
XIII
348
XIV
370
XV
389
XVI
404
XVII
431

IX
249
XVIII
456

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Page 186 - River, and moved through a considerable swamp and formed on a plain the other side, the most extensive I ever saw. containing not less than six thousand acres of the richest soil that can be conceived, not having a bush standing, but filled with grass considerably higher than a man. We moved up this plain for about three miles in our regular line of march, which was a beautiful sight, as a view of the whole could be had at one look...
Page 330 - 20 were a period of gloom and agony. No money, either gold or silver : no paper convertible into specie: no measure, or standard of value, left remaining. The local banks (all but those of New England), after a brief resumption of specie payments, again sank into a state of suspension.
Page 330 - ... exchanges deranged to the extent of fifty or one hundred per cent. Distress, the universal cry of the people: Relief, the universal demand thundered at the doors of all legislatures, state and federal...
Page 536 - Vedder. While I am in the service I shall be paid only by you. And my reason for that is, that I wish my account with the Government to be kept with one Paymaster only ; for it is my purpose at the close of the war to call on you for an accurate statement of all the money I have received from the United States. The amount, whatever it is, I shall give to some permanent institution founded for the life relief of disabled soldiers. This is the least invidious way in which I can refuse pay for fighting...
Page 161 - Monuments and eulogy belong to the dead. We give them this day to Warren and his associates. On other occasions they have been given to your more immediate companions in arms, to Washington, to Greene, to Gates, to Sullivan, and to Lincoln.
Page 296 - The commanders were popular men, ' destitute alike of theory and experience' in the art of war. In a few days the troops under my command will plant the American standard in Canada. They are men accustomed to obedience, silence, and steadiness. They will conquer, or they will die. Will you stand with your arms folded and look on this interesting struggle?
Page 191 - Sullivan, and the brave officers and soldiers under his command, for effectually executing an important expedition against such of the Indian nations as, encouraged by the counsels and conducted by the officers of his Britannic majesty, had perfidiously waged an uprovoked and cruel war against these United States, laid waste many of their defenceless towns, and with savage barbarity slaughtered the inhabitants thereof.
Page 191 - Bounty they are derived, the United States in Congress assembled, do recommend it to the several States, to set apart the second Thursday in December next, as a day of public thanksgiving, that all the people may then assemble to celebrate with grateful hearts and united voices, the praises of their Supreme and all bountiful Benefactor, for his numberless favours and mercies.
Page 330 - Stop laws — property laws — replevin laws — stay laws — loan office laws — the intervention of the legislature between the creditor and the debtor; this was the business of legislation in three-fourths of the states of the Union — of all south and west of New England.
Page 148 - The Expedition you are appointed to command is to be directed against the hostile tribes of the Six Nations of Indians, with their associates and adherents. The immediate objects are the total destruction and devastation of their settlements, and the capture of as many prisoners of every age and sex as possible.

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