A history of Whitby, and Streoneshalh abbey: with a statistical survey of the vicinity to the distance of twenty-five miles, Volume 1

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Printed and sold by Clark and Medd, 1817 - Whitby (England)
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Page 311 - The gentlemen being present, bade him save their lives. Then said the hermit, "You and yours shall hold your lands of the Abbot of Whitby, and his successors, in this manner: That, upon...
Page 161 - When he had so said, Colman answered, " It is strange that you will call our labours foolish, wherein we follow the example of so great an apostle, who was thought worthy to lay his head on our Lord's bosom, when all the world knows him to have lived most wisely.
Page 311 - Allatson, shall take nine of each sort, to be cut as aforesaid, and to be taken on your backs, and carried to the town of Whitby, and to be there before nine of the clock the same...
Page 161 - And they are informed of thee, that thou teachest all the Jews which are among the Gentiles to forsake Moses, saying, That they ought not to circumcise their children, neither to walk after the customs.
Page 310 - The hermit shut the hounds out of the chapel, and kept himself within at his meditations and prayers, the hounds standing at bay without. The gentlemen, in the thick of the wood...
Page 459 - ... to the observation of good religion : so that without such small houses be utterly suppressed, and the religious persons therein committed to great and honourable monasteries of religion in this realm, where they may be compelled to live religiously for reformation of their lives, the same else be no redress nor reformation in that behalf.
Page 159 - This Easter, which I used to observe, I received from my elders, who sent me bishop hither, which all our fathers, men beloved of God, are known to have celebrated after the same manner, which, that it may not seem unto any to be contemned and rejected, is the same which the blessed Evangelist St. John, the disciple especially beloved by our Lord, with all the churches that he did oversee, is read to have celebrated.
Page 311 - ... in remembrance that you did most cruelly slay me, and that you may the better call to God for mercy, repent unfeignedly of your sins, and do good works. The officer of Eskdale-side shall blow ' Out on you, out on you, out on you,
Page 311 - Death. But the Hermit being a holy Man, and being very sick, and at the Point of Death, sent for the Abbot, and desired him to send for the Gentlemen, who tad wounded him to Death. The Abbot so doing, the Gentlemen came, and the Hermit being sore sick, said, I am sure to die of these Wounds.
Page 311 - You shall faithfully do this in remembrance that you did most cruelly slay me ; and that you may the better call to God for mercy, repent unfeignedly of your sins, and do good works. The officer of Eskdaleside shall blow, Out on you ! Out on you ! Out on you ! for this heinous crime.

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