A History of Winchester College

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Duckworth & Company, 1899 - England - 564 pages
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Page 384 - I can now excuse all his foibles; impute them to age, and to distress of circumstances: the last of these considerations wrings my very soul to think on. For a man of high spirit conscious of having (at least in one production) generally pleased the world, to be plagued and threatened by wretches that are low in every sense; to be forced to drink himself into pains of the body, in order to get rid of the pains of the mind is a misery.
Page 13 - Ethelwerd the youngest, by the divine counsels and the admirable prudence of the king, was consigned to the schools of learning, where, with the children of almost all the nobility of the country, and many also who were not noble, he prospered under the diligent care of his teachers. Books in both languages, namely, Latin and Saxon, were both read in the school. They also learned to write...
Page 323 - I find it thus far experimentally true, that at my now being in that school, and seeing that very place where I sat when I was a boy, occasioned me to remember those very thoughts of my youth which then possessed me ; sweet thoughts, indeed, that promised my growing years numerous pleasures without mixtures of cares, and those to be enjoyed when time (which I therefore thought slow-paced) had changed my youth into manhood.
Page 348 - I do declare and promise that I will be true and faithful to the commonwealth of England, as the same is now established, without a King or House of Lords...
Page vii - There is now less flogging in our great schools than formerly, but then less is learned there ; so that what the boys get at one end they lose at the other.
Page 323 - ... cares, and those to be enjoyed when time (which I therefore thought slow-paced) had changed my youth into manhood. But age and experience have taught me that those were but empty hopes ; for I have always found it true, as my Saviour did foretell, ' Sufficient for the day is the evil thereof.' Nevertheless, I saw there a succession of boys using the same recreations, and, questionless, possessed with the same thoughts that then possessed me. Thus one generation succeeds another, both in their...
Page 13 - ... complete subjection to their father; nor, among their other studies which appertain to this life and are fit for noble youths, are they suffered to pass their time idly and unprofitably without learning the liberal arts ; for they have carefully learned the Psalms and Saxon books, especially the Saxon poems, and are continually in the habit of making use of books.
Page 387 - Poor dear Collins! Let me know whether you think it would give him pleasure if I should write to him. I have often been near his state, and therefore have it in great commiseration.
Page 322 - An ambassador is an honest man, sent to lie abroad for the good of his country.
Page 96 - We allow, however, sons of noble and influential persons, special friends of the said college, to the number of ten to be instructed and informed in grammar within the said college, without charge to the college, so that by occasion * The Ars Minor of Donatus, the fourth-century teacher of St.

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