A History of Epidemics in Britain ...

Front Cover
The University Press, 1894 - Epidemics
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Contents

The Suttonian Inoculation
495
Extent of Inoculation in Britain to the end of the l8th Century
504
The Epidemiology continued from 1721
517
Smallpox in London in the middle of the 18th century
529
The Epidemiology continued to the end of the 18th century
535
The range of severity in Smallpox and its circumstances
544
Cowpox
557
Chronology of epidemics resumed from 1801
567
Extent of Inoculation with Cowpox or Smallpox 18011825
582
The Smallpox Epidemic of 182526
593
Smallpox in Ireland 183040
601
Other effects of the epidemic of 183740 on medical opinion
610
The ageincidence of Smallpox in various periods of history
622
CHAPTER V
632
Measles in the iSth century
641
Increasing mortality from Measles at the end of the 18th century
647
Measles in the Period of Statistics
660
CHAPTER VI
666
Whoopingcough as a Sequel of other Maladies
674
Nosological difficulties in the earlier history
678
The Throatdistemper of New England 173536
685
Angina maligna in England from 1739
691
Scarlet Fever at St Albans 1748
698
Scarlatina anginosa in its modern form 177778
708
Scarlatina 1788 and Diphtheria 179394 described by the same
715
Scarlatina since the beginning of Registration 1837
726
Reappearance of Diphtheria in 185659
736
Conditions favouring Diphtheria
744
Summer Diarrhoea of Infants i8th century
754
Causes of the high Deathrates from Infantile Diarrhoea
763
Dysentery in the I7th and i8th centuries
774
Dysentery in the igth century
785
CHAPTER IX
793
Extension of Cholera to the Tyne December 1831
802
The Cholera of 1832 in Ireland
816
The Cholera of 184849 in Scotland
835
The Cholera of 1853 at Newcastle and Gateshead
849
The Cholera of 185354 in Scotland and Ireland
855

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Page 757 - As one who, long in populous city pent, Where houses thick and sewers annoy the air, Forth issuing on a summer's morn to breathe Among the pleasant villages and farms Adjoin'd, from each thing met conceives delight ; The smell of grain, or tedded grass, or kine, Or dairy, each rural sight, each rural sound...
Page 448 - ... the smallpox was always present, filling the churchyards with corpses, tormenting with constant fears all whom it had not yet stricken, leaving on those whose lives it spared the hideous traces of its power, turning the babe into a changeling at which the mother shuddered, and making the eyes and cheeks of the betrothed maiden objects of horror to the lover.
Page 234 - It is a melancholy object to those who walk through this great town, or travel in the country, when they see the streets, the roads, and cabin-doors, crowded with beggars of the female sex, followed by three, four, or six children, all in rags, and importuning every passenger for an alms.
Page 318 - Thus died King Charles II. of a vigorous and robust constitution, and in all appearance promising a long life. He was a prince of many virtues, and many great imperfections...
Page 448 - That disease, over which science has since achieved a succession of glorious and beneficent victories, was then the most terrible of all the ministers of death. The havoc of the plague...
Page 278 - I beheld, with sorrow, one wide waste of putrefying vegetation. In many places the wretched people were seated on the fences of their decaying gardens, wringing their hands, and wailing bitterly the destruction that had left them foodless.
Page 193 - I have heard, of the sufferings and privations of the poor, of provision shops where ha'porths of tea, sugar, butter, and even flour, were sold to accommodate the indigent - of parents sitting in their clothes by the fireside during the whole night, for seven weeks together, in order that their only bed and bedding might be reserved for the use of their large family - of others sleeping upon the cold hearthstone for weeks in succession, without adequate means of providing themselves with food or...
Page 318 - Jesuit's powder; but it made him worse, and some very able doctors who were present did not think it a fever, but the effect of his frequent bleeding and other sharp operations used by them about his head, so that probably the powder might stop the circulation, and renew his former fits, which now made him very weak.
Page 235 - Whether she would not be a very vile matron, and justly thought either mad or foolish, that should give away the necessaries of life from her naked and famished children, in exchange...
Page 36 - ... had nightly shot corpses by scores. It was popularly believed that the earth was deeply tainted with infection, and could not be disturbed without imminent risk to human life.

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