A History of Modern Liberty, Volume 1

Front Cover
Longmans, Green, 1906 - Europe - 398 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 280 - ... of wools, that is to wit, a toll of forty shillings for every sack of wool, and have made petition to us to release the same ; we, at their requests, have clearly released it, and have granted for us and our heirs that we shall not take such thing nor any other without their common assent and goodwill ; saving to us and our heirs the custom of wools, skins, and leather granted before by the commonalty aforesaid.
Page 280 - Crown, shall be void and of no avail or force whatever ; but the matters which are to be established for the estate of our lord the King and of his heirs, and for the estate of the realm and of the people, shall be treated, accorded, and established in Parliaments, by our lord the King, and by the assent of the prelates, earls, and barons, and the commonalty of the realm ; according as it hath been heretofore accustomed.
Page 280 - Moreover, we have granted for us and our heirs, as well to archbishops, bishops, abbots, priors, and other folk of holy Church, as also to earls, barons, and to all the commonalty of the land, that for no business from henceforth will we take such manner of aids, tasks, nor prises, but by the common assent of the realm, and for the common profit thereof, saving the ancient aids and prises due and accustomed.
Page 311 - Good people," cried the preacher, " things will never go well in England so long as goods be not in common, and so long as there be villeins and gentlemen. By what right are they whom we call lords greater folk than we? On what grounds have they deserved it ? Why do they hold us in serfage ? If we all came of the same father and mother, of Adam and Eve, how can they say or prove that they are better than we, if it be not that they make us gain for them by our toil what they spend in their pride?...
Page 314 - Jack Miller asketh help to turn his mill aright. He hath grounden small, small: the King's Son of Heaven he shall pay for all. Look thy mill go aright with the four sailes, and the post stand with steadfastness.
Page 311 - By what right are they whom we call lords greater folk than we? On what grounds have they deserved it ? Why do they hold us in serfage ? If we all came of the same father and mother, of Adam and Eve, how can they say or prove that they are better than we, if it be not that they make us gain for them by our toil what they spend in their pride? They are clothed in velvet, and warm in their furs and their ermines, while we are covered with rags. They have wine and spices and fair bread ; and we oat-cake...
Page 312 - Langland pictures the homely poor in their ill-fed, hard-working condition, battling against hunger, famine, injustice, oppression, and all the stern realities and hardships that tried them as gold is tried in the fire. Chaucer's satire often raises a good-humoured laugh; but...
Page 236 - Neither the duchess nor her descendants shall begin either an offensive or defensive war without consent of the estates. In case a war be illegally undertaken, the estates are not bound to contribute to its maintenance. In all public and legal documents the Netherland language shall be employed. The commands of the duchess shall be invalid if conflicting with the privileges- of a city. The seat of the Supreme Council is transferred from Mechlin to the Hogne.
Page 291 - from one cause or another groups of men were "formed in the midst of every town who were shut out from the civic life of the " community, and whose natural bond of union was hostility to the privileged class ' which denied them the dignity of free citizens and refused them fair competition ' in trading enterprise. The burghers yearly added to their number half-a-dozen ' or perhaps a score of members wealthy enough to buy the privilege, while the ' increase in the unenfranchised class, which had begun...
Page 352 - Aryan race and races of other stocks, but it suggests that many, perhaps most, of the differences in kind alleged to exist between Aryan subraces are really differences merely in degree of development. It is to be hoped that contemporary thought will before long make an effort to emancipate itself from those habits of levity in adopting theories of race which it seems to have contracted. Many of • these theories appear to have little merit except the facility which they give for building on them...

Bibliographic information