A History of Painting in North Italy: Venice, Padua, Vicenza, Verona, Ferrara, Milan, Friuli, Brescia, from the Fourteenth to the Sixteenth Century ...

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J. Murray, 1871 - Painting
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Page 164 - The Virgin and six Saints. A most beautiful picture, painted for a chapel at S. Giobbe, which was especially arranged to bring all its beauties into relief. It is the crowning work of this great master, which established his fame and led to his employment by the State. ' Finely thought out is the concentration of light on the Virgin, seated with the Babe on her knee, looking forward as if struck by some external event, yet full of calm benevolence ; varied the movements of the three angels playing...
Page 131 - ... gallants, prince and princess, and ladies in waiting, all in the rich Venetian robes of the period, all in positions as diverse as natural. Here and there are traces of archaism, but, although one may not fully agree, one can understand why Crowe and Cavalcaselle should have said of the picture, " There is no doubt that this is the most important extant work of the Venetian school previous to the advent of Titian.
Page 169 - ... partridge alike elect to congregate! How noble the proportions of the saints, how grand and real the portrait of the Doge! it is that here large contrasts of light and shade are united with bright and blended tone; that the atmosphere is playing round these people and helping them to live and move before us, and nature is ennobled by thought and skill.2 As 1 Murano, San Pietro Martire.
Page 163 - This beautiful production appears to combine all the qualities for which Bellini might up to this time have claimed praise, — appropriate and dignified composition, noble character, elevated feeling, and chastened design.
Page 167 - Academy, in which we know not which to admire more, the noble gravity of the mother or the pulsation of life in the Child. Bellini certainly never so completely combined relief with transparence, or golden tinge of flesh with a rich harmony of tints. By dint of perseverance he had succeeded in losing all trace of hardness, and acquired what may be called the Giorgionesque touch.
Page ii - Fourteenth to the Sixteenth Century. Drawn up from Fresh Materials after Recent Researches in the Archives of Italy, and from Personal Inspection of the Works of Art scattered throughout Europe. With illustrations. 2 vols., 8vo, London, 1871. Characterized by the same minute and exhaustive scholarship as that manifested in the same authors
Page 88 - ... have so little information that we cannot do more than consider the results which we possess in their pictures. In the case of Crivelli, the inferences are fairly obvious. From the beginning to the end of his career he always painted in tempera, to which, as Crowe and Cavalcaselle remark, he "clings with a desperate fondness at a time when all painters were trying oils
Page 166 - THE MADONNA OF THE TWO TREES" ACADEMY: VENICE " TT was in 1487," write Crowe and Cavalcaselle, "that Bellini produced the X beautiful ' Virgin and Child ' of the Venice Academy, in which we know not which to admire more, the noble gravity of the mother or the pulsation of life in the Child. Bellini certainly never so completely combined relief with transparence, or golden tinge of flesh with a rich harmony of tints. By dint of perseverance he had succeeded in losing all trace of hardness, and acquired...
Page ii - ... with which the garrulous Florentine, in mediaeval fashion, garnishes his Golden Legend of the Saints of Art, the lack of such details is amply supplied by the abundance of novel tacts, intricate investigations, and able general views which render the work of Messrs.

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