A history of the class of 1854 in Dartmouth college: including Col. Haskell's narrative of the battle of Gettysburg

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A. Mudge, 1898 - 153 pages
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Page 151 - I've been wand'ring away — To see thus around me my youth's early friends, As smiling and kind as in that happy day ? Though haply o'er some of your brows, as o'er mine, The snow-fall of time may be stealing — what then ? Like Alps in the sunset, thus lighted by wine...
Page 127 - Corps, the trees were almost literally peeled, from the ground up some fifteen or twenty feet, so thick upon them were the scars the bullets had made. Upon a single tree, not over a foot and a half in diameter, I actually counted as many as two hundred and fifty bullet marks. The ground was covered by the little twigs that had been cut off by the hailstorm of lead. Such were the evidences of the storm under which...
Page 102 - A half a dozen horses start, they tumble, their legs stiffen, their vitals and blood smear the ground. And these shot and shells have no respect for men either. We see the poor fellows hobbling back from the crest, or unable to do so, pale and weak, lying on the ground with the mangled stump of an arm or leg, dripping their life-blood away; or with a cheek torn open, or a shoulder mashed.
Page 102 - ... say that it was like a summer storm, with the crash of thunder, the glare of lightning, the shrieking of the wind, and the clatter of hailstones, would be weak. The thunder and lightning of these two hundred and fifty guns and their shells, whose smoke darkens the sky, are incessant, all pervading, in the air above our heads, on the ground at our feet, remote, near, deafening, ear-piercing, astounding; and these hailstones are massy iron, charged with exploding fire. And there is little of human...
Page 103 - Artillery men upon the crest, budged not an inch, nor intermitted, but, though caisson and limber were smashed, and guns dismantled, and men and horses, killed, there amidst smoke and sweat, they gave back without grudge or loss of time in the sending, in kind whatever the enemy sent, globe, and cone, and bolt, hollow or solid, — an iron greeting to the rebellion, — the compliments of the wrathful Republic. An hour has droned its flight, since first the war began, — there is no sign of weariness...
Page 102 - Fredericksburg on the llth of December, we had heard heavy cannonading; they were but holiday salutes compared with this. Besides the great ceaseless roar of the guns, which was but the background of the others, a million various minor sounds engaged the ear. The projectiles shriek long and sharp. They hiss, they scream, they growl, they sputter; all sounds of life and rage; and each has its different note, and all are discordant. Was ever such a chorus of sound before? We note the effect of the...
Page 112 - By the tactics I understand my place is in rear of the men." "Your pardon, sir; I see your place is in rear of the men.
Page 106 - The artillery fight over, men began to breathe more freely, and to ask, What next, I wonder? The battery men were among their guns, some leaning to rest and wipe the sweat from their sooty faces, some were handling ammunition boxes and replenishing those that were empty. Some batteries from the artillery reserve were moving up to take the places of the disabled ones; the smoke was clearing from the crests. There was a pause between acts, with the curtain down, soon to rise upon the final act, and...
Page 110 - ... right, when they were all massed in the position desired, he would again face them to the front, and advance to the storming. This was the way he made the wall before Webb's line blaze red with his battle flags, and such was the purpose there of his thick-crowding battalions. Not a moment must be lost. Colonel Hall I found just in rear of his line, sword in hand, cool, vigilant, noting all that passed and directing the battle of his brigade. The fire was constantly diminishing now in his front,...
Page 101 - ... yards. A hundred and twentyfive rebel guns, we estimate, are now active, firing twentyfour pound, twenty, twelve and ten-pound projectiles, solid shot and shells, spherical, conical, spiral. The enemy's fire is chiefly concentrated upon the position of the Second Corps. From the Cemetery to Round Top, with over a hundred guns, and to all parts of the enemy's line, our batteries reply, of twenty and ten-pound...

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