A History of the Town of Fair Haven, Vermont: In Three Parts

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Leonard & Phelps, printers, 1870 - Fair Haven (Vt. : Town) - 516 pages
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Page 422 - ... when I shall behold men of real merit daily turned out of office, for no other cause but independency of sentiment ; when I shall see men of firmness, merit, years, abilities, and experience, discarded in their applications for office, for fear they possess that independence, and men of meanness preferred for the ease with which they take up and advocate opinions, the consequence of which they know but little of— when I shall see the sacred name of religion employed as a state engine to make...
Page 421 - I shall behold men of real merit daily turned out of office, for no other cause but independency of sentiment ; when I shall see men of firmness, merit, years, abilities, and experience, discarded in their applications for office, for fear they possess that independence, and men of meanness preferred for...
Page 421 - As to the Executive, when I shall see the efforts of that power bent on the promotion of the comfort, the happiness, and accommodation of the people, that executive shall have my zealous and uniform support: but whenever I shall, on the part of the Executive, see every consideration of the public welfare swallowed up in a continual grasp for power, in an unbounded thirst for ridiculous pomp, foolish adulation, and selfish avarice; when I shall behold men of real merit daily turned out of office,...
Page 422 - ... of sentiment ; when I shall see men of firmness, merit, years, abilities, and experience, discarded in their applications for office, for fear they possess that independence, and men of meanness preferred for the ease with which they take up and advocate opinions, the consequence of which they know but little of — when I shall see the sacred name of religion employed as a state engine to make mankind hate and persecute one another, I shall not be their humble advocate.
Page 420 - I did not take the right method with him. We do not always possess the power of judging calmly what is the best mode of resenting an unpardonable insult. Had I borne it patiently I should have been bandied about in all the newspapers on the continent which -are supported by British money and federal patronage, as a mean poltroon. The district which sent me would have been scandalized.
Page 11 - ATHENS aforesaid his heirs or assigns shall plant and cultivate ten acres of land and build a house at least eighteen feet square on the floor, or have one family settled on each respective right or share of land in said...
Page 494 - That all might envy, though so few can share; Averse to foolish, overweening pride, So oft to vice and ignorance allied, Which swells the selfish and contracted mind Beyond the sphere for which it was designed; A generous spirit marked his short career, And rising greatness was implanted there. Ardent for fame, impatient to sustain Columbia's glory on the raging main, The young aspirant left his native shore, To which fate doomed him to return no more.
Page 222 - In that case the defendant with other persons signed an agreement in writing by which they each agreed to take the number of shares "of the capital stock of said company set opposite our respective names, and agree to pay therefor in such time and manner as required by said company.
Page 494 - To which fate doomed him to return no more. Alas! untimely lost, in youthful bloom, An early victim to a wat'ry tomb. Accept, lamented youth, this friendly lay, 'Tis the last tribute that the muse can pay; One who but lately knew, yet knew thee well, And bids thee now a long, a last farewell.
Page 490 - Detroit; the old government after the fire in 1805 having remained in abeyance. In 1812 the war with England was declared, and Judge Witherell being, in the absence of Governor Hull, the only Revolutionary officer in the territory, was appointed to command the legion ordered out to defend the territory. He was soon after appointed to command a battalion of volunteers. On the surrender of Detroit he refused to surrender his corps, but let them disperse wherever they chose. In 1810 Judge With-erell...

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