A History of Wonderful Inventions, Volumes 1-2

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Harper & brothers, 1849 - Inventions - 125 pages
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Contents

I
1
II
12
III
19
IV
40
V
49
VI
77
VII
85
VIII
90
IX
112
X
1
XI
38
XII
67
XIII
90
XIV
107
XV
118

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Page 20 - Out of the bowels of the harmless earth, Which many a good tall fellow had destroy'd So cowardly ; and, but for these vile guns, He would himself have been a soldier.
Page 106 - Achromatic Lenses. The color effect caused by the chromatic aberration of a simple lens greatly impairs its usefulness.
Page 12 - ... which is but at such a distance. But this way hath no bounder, if the vessels be strong enough ; for I have taken a piece of a whole cannon, whereof the end was burst, and filled it...
Page 48 - There was exhibited on it a negro, a shepherd, and a dog. When the clock struck, the shepherd played six tunes on his flute, and the dog approached and fawned upon him. This clock was exhibited to the king of Spain, who was greatly delighted with it. " The gentleness of my dog," said Droz,
Page 12 - An admirable and most forcible way to drive up water by fire, not by drawing or sucking it upwards, for that must be as the philosopher calleth it, infra spheeram activitatis, which is but at such a distance. But this way hath no bounder, if the vessels be strong enough...
Page 54 - Faust was so pleased with the contrivance, that he promised Peter to give him his only daughter Christina in marriage, a promise which he soon after performed. But there were as many difficulties at first with these letters, as there had been before with...
Page 77 - As I had occasion to pass daily to and from the building-yard while my boat was in progress, I have often loitered unknown near the idle groups of strangers, gathering in little circles, and heard various inquiries as to the object of this new vehicle. The language was uniformly that of scorn, or sneer, or ridicule. The loud laugh often rose at my expense ; the ' dry jest ; the wise calculations of losses and expenditures ; the dull but endless repetition of the Fulton Folly.
Page 12 - I have seen the water run like a constant fountain stream, forty feet high ; one vessel of water, rarified by fire, driveth up forty of cold water. And a man that tends the work is but to turn two cocks, that one vessel of water being consumed, another begins to force and refill with cold water, and so successively, the fire being tended and kept constant, which the self-same person may likewise abundantly perform in the interim, between the necessity of turning the said cocks.
Page 93 - The manner of the carriage is, by laying rails of timber from the colliery to the river, exactly straight and parallel ; and bulky carts are made with four rollers fitting those rails, whereby the carriage is so easy that one horse will draw down four or five chaldron of coals, and is an immense benefit to the coal merchants.
Page 78 - The man who, while he looked on the expensive machine. thanked his stars that he had more wisdom than to waste his money on such idle schemes, changed the expression of his features as the boat moved from the wharf and gained her speed; his complacent smile gradually stiffened into an expression of wonder.

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