A House of Gentlefolk: A Novel

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Heinemann, 1920 - Russian fiction - 311 pages
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Page 309 - ... were not only for himself ; he had, to the best of his powers, secured on a firm basis the welfare of his peasants. Lavretsky went out of the house into the garden, and sat down on the familiar garden seat And on this loved spot, facing the house where for the last time he had vainly stretched out his hand for the enchanted cup which frothed and sparkled with the golden wine of delight, he, a solitary homeless wanderer, looked back upon his life, while the joyous shouts of the younger generation...
Page 148 - And what a time, what a place for men to 148 think of loafing ! ' he cried at four o'clock, in a voice, however, which showed signs of sleepiness; 'among us! now! in Russia! where every separate individuality has a duty resting upon him, a solemn responsibility to God, to the people, to himself. We are sleeping, and the time is slipping away ; we are sleeping.
Page 209 - Away, dark phantom of the past," he thought. "She loves me, she will be mine." Suddenly it seemed to him that in the air over his head were floating strains of divine triumphant music. He stood still. The music resounded in still greater magnificence ; a mighty flood of melody — and all his bliss seemed speaking and singing in its strains. He looked about him ; the music floated down from two upper windows of a small house. "Lemm?
Page 210 - Christopher Fedoritch, what marvellous music ! for mercy's sake, let me in.' Without uttering a word, the old man with a majestic flourish of the arm dropped the key of the street door from the window. Lavretsky hastened up-stairs, went into the room and was about to rush up to Lemm ; but the latter imperiously motioned him to a seat, saying abruptly in Russian, ' Sit down and listen,' sat down himself to the piano, and looking proudly and severely about him, he began to play. It was long since Lavretsky...
Page 306 - Gedeonovsky," added her brother. At Gedeonovsky's name a merry laugh broke out at once. "Yes, he is alive, and as great a liar as ever," Marya Dmitrievna's son continued ; " and only fancy, yesterday this madcap " — pointing to the schoolgirl, his wife's sister — "put some pepper in his snuff-box." "How he did sneeze!" cried Lenotchka; and again there was a burst of unrestrained laughter. "We have had news of Lisa lately," observed young Kalitin, — and again a hush fell upon all: "there was...
Page 301 - Once more the breezes of spring breathed brightness and rejoicing from the heavens ; once more spring was smiling upon the earth and upon men ; once more under her caresses everything was turning to blossom, to love, to song. The town of O had undergone little change in the course of these eight years ; but Marfa Dmitrievna's house seemed to have grown younger ; its...
Page 310 - ... how many of us did not last out? — but you need only do your duty, work away, and the blessing of an old man be with you. For me, after to-day, after these emotions, there remains to take my leave at last; and. though sadly, without envy, without any dark feelings, to say, in sight of the end, in sight of God who awaits me : ' Welcome, lonely old age ! burn out, useless life ! ' " Lavretsky quietly rose and quietly went away; no one noticed him, no one detained him: the joyous cries sounded...
Page 311 - ... high lime trees. He took his seat in the carriage and bade the coachman drive home and not hurry the horses. . . . They say, Lavretsky visited that convent where Liza had hidden herself — that he saw her. Crossing over from choir to choir, she walked close past him, moving with the even, hurried, but meek walk of a nun ; and she did not glance at him ; only the eyelashes on the side towards him quivered a little, only she bent her emaciated face lower, and the fingers of her clasped hands,...
Page 26 - Lemm might, in time—who knows ?—have taken rank with the great composers of his fatherland, had his life been different; but he was born under an unlucky star! He had written much in his life, and it had not been granted to him to see one of his compositions produced; he did not know how to set about things in the right way, to gain favour in the right place, and to make a push at the right moment.
Page 224 - On his entrance there rose from the sofa a lady in a black silk dress with flounces, who, raising a cambric handkerchief to her pale face, made a few paces forward, bent her carefully dressed, perfumed head, and fell at his feet. . . . Then, only, he recognised her : . this lady was his wife ! " He caught his breath. ... He leaned against the wall. " ' Theodore, do not repulse me ! ' she said in French, and her voice cut to his heart like a knife. " He looked at her senselessly, and yet he noticed...

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