A Human Document: A Novel, Volume 1

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Chapman and Hall, 1892
 

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Page 21 - Consecration" which Irma could never have written : "Were my power as a writer equal to my love as a woman, that life should live in these pages, as it lived and breathed once in our now lonely bodies. I would make it live — all of it ; I would keep back nothing ; for perfect love casts out shame. But if anyone should think that I ought to blush for what I have written, I should be proud if, in witness of my love for you, every page of it were as crimson as a rose."14 So ends A Human Documenl.
Page 31 - Finally, if the book is complained of because people who are not technically virtuous are shown in it to have been ultimately happy, as such people often are, I would point out that their happiness, such as it is, results from qualities in them which every one must admire, and not from those of their actions, which perhaps most people will condemn.
Page 1 - A HUMAN DOCUMENT. INTRODUCTION. THE following work, though it has the form of a novel, yet for certain singular reasons hardly deserves the name. I happened to be staying at a country house on the Continent a year or so after the publication of a now celebrated book. That book was the Journal of Marie...
Page 113 - ... lost, but colours the air of maturity with all the colours of a sunset. "Let me ramble on about this subject a little longer. Most men love, I suppose, at one time of their lives ; but the love-memories of most of them are like decayed, or at least like dried, rose-leaves. The love-memories of others are like attar of roses. For these men, love in this changed form penetrates all their lives, breathing amongst their thoughts like the breath of spring in a wood, or perhaps like VOL.
Page 14 - ... a rough and experimental copy, interspersed with raw materials, of which as yet she had used part only. " So much," I said to Countess Z ,
Page 24 - In the English fiction of today it is a universal rule that the men, and especially the women, with whom the reader is invited to sympathize, shall all stop short of one another at a certain point, whatever may be their dispositions or circumstances. It is also a rule equally universal that any grave transgression of the conventional moral code shall entail on its transgressors some appropriate punishment, or, at all events, that it shall not...
Page 22 - Were my power as a writer equal to my love as a woman, that life should live in these pages, as it lived and breathed once in our now lonely bodies. I would make it live — all of it ; I would keep back nothing ; for perfect love casts out shame. But if anyone should think that I ought to blush for what I have written, I should be proud if, in witness of my love for you, every page of it were as crimson as a rose."14 So ends A Human Documenl. We must admit that the book has many literary and artistic...
Page 82 - Ashford is a true prophet. She says he is to find in love the "much more" that he has always looked for in vain. She too can coin an epigram upon occasion : "To love successfully you must often have loved in vain." "Some of the women. . .who have loved best have been women who found that they could not love their husbands . . . And why ? They have learnt how much they longed to give and receive, by realizing how much one man could neither understand nor give...
Page 102 - ... present attitudes as they are. So, conveniently for us, he makes a chart of his present situation. He confesses his ambition for distinction, and his realization of a need for money to rejuvenate the family fortunes and estates. This autobiographical bit Mallock further supplements by a prophecy : "How often have I shuddered at certain old men of fashion, with no home except a London lodging and their clubs, and with no life except dining, shooting, and visiting with a dwindling circle of friends...
Page 142 - ... watching the roofs and outlines of the castle. Every morning he did the same, moving about like a solitary human being in fairyland. Wherever he turned was something with the stamp of the old regime on it.

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