A Hunter's Experiences in the Southern States of America: Being an Account of the Natural History of the Various Quadrupeds and Birds which are the Objects of Chase in Those Countries

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Longmans, Green and Company, 1866 - Hunting - 359 pages
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Page 80 - With flowing tail and flying mane, Wide nostrils, never stretched by pain. Mouths bloodless to the bit or rein, And feet that iron never shod, And flanks unscarred by spur or rod, A thousand horse, the wild, the free, Like waves that follow o'er the sea, Came thickly thundering on, As if our faint approach to meet ; The sight renerved my courser's feet.
Page 282 - Excepting mosquitoes," cried the Hoosier. "Well, stranger, except them; for it ar a fact that they are rather enormous, and do push themselves in somewhat troublesome. But, stranger, they never stick twice in the same place; and give them a fair chance for a few months, and you will get as much above noticing them as an alligator. They can't hurt my feelings, for they lay under the skin; and I never knew but one case of injury resulting from them, and that was to a Yankee: and they take worse to...
Page 127 - I expected, go up to her fallen partner, and press her tapering nose to his body. She was not more than twenty yards from me, and I could plainly see that her look was one of inquiry and bewilderment. All at once, she seemed to comprehend the fatal truth ; and, throwing back her head, commenced uttering the most piteous cries, at the same time running in circles around the body.
Page 283 - ... as much above noticing them as an alligator. They can't hurt my feelings, for they lay under the skin ; and I never knew but one case of injury resulting from them, and that was to a Yankee : and they take worse to foreigners, any how, than they do to natives. But the way they used that fellow up...
Page 312 - Old bruin was not to be put off by one hint — three times in rapid succession he rushed at the alligator, and was as often repulsed in the same manner, being knocked back by each blow just far enough to give the alligator time to recover the swing of his tail before lie returned.
Page 127 - All at once she seemed to comprehend the fatal truth; and throwing back her head, commenced uttering the most piteous cries, at the same time running in circles around the body. I stood wavering between two minds. My first impulse had been to reload and kill the doe ; but her plaintive voice entered my heart, disarming me of all hostile intentions. Had I dreamt of witnessing this painful spectacle, I should not have left the trail. But the mischief was now done. " I have worse than killed her," thought...
Page 283 - But mosquitoes is natur, and I never find fault with her. If they ar large, Arkansaw is large, her varmints ar large, her trees ar large, her rivers ar large, and a small mosquito would be of no more use in Arkansaw than preaching in a cane-brake.
Page 313 - ... tail in agony, he happened to strike it against a small tree that stood next the bank ; aided by this purchase, he made a convulsive flounder, which precipitated himself and Bruin, locked together, into the river. The bank from which they fell was four feet high, and the water below seven feet deep. The tranquil stream received the combatants with a loud splash, then closed over them in silence. A volley of ascending bubbles announced their arrival at the bottom, where the battle ended. Presently...
Page 125 - I then cautiously crept through the thorny leaves toward the point where I fancied I had seen the game. To my joy, not one antelope, but a brace of those beautiful animals, was quietly grazing beyond; but alas! too far off for the carry of my rifle. They were fully three hundred yards distant, upon a smooth, grassy slope. There was not even a sage bush to cover me, should I attempt to approach them.
Page 240 - An hour may elapse, and he has resolved the matter over ; his imagination has become inflamed, he has heard just enough to wish to hear more; he is satisfied that no turkey-hunter uttered the sounds that reached his ear, for they were too few, and far between, and...

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