A just vindication of learning

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Garland Pub., 1978 - Law - 78 pages
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About the author (1978)

Daniel Defoe was born Daniel Foe in London in 1660, adding the "De" after he reached the age of 40. He was a novelist, journalist, and political agent. Defoe's best-known novels include Robinson Crusoe and Moll Flanders. Defoe also wrote the 3-volume A Tour Thro' the Whole Island of Great Britain, an important source of English economic life. He wrote satirical poems and pamphlets and edited a newspaper. Defoe was imprisoned and pilloried for his controversial work, The Shortest Way with the Dissenters, which suggested that all non-Conformist ministers be hanged. Defoe also was the first writer of modern English ghost stories, one of which is "A True Relation of the Apparition of One Mrs. Veal." He died in 1731.

Jeremy Bentham was born in London, in 1748, the son of an attorney. He was admitted to Queen's College, Oxford, at age 12 and graduated in 1763 An English reformer and political philosopher, Bentham spent his life supporting countless social and political reform measures and trying as well to create a science of human behavior. He advocated a utopian welfare state and designed model cities, prisons, schools, and so on, to achieve that goal. He defined his goal as the objective study and measurement of passions and feelings, pleasures and pains, will and action. The principle of "the greatest happiness of the greatest number," set forth in his Introduction to the Principles of Morals and Legislation, governed all of his schemes for the improvement of society, and the philosophy he devised, called utilitarianism, set a model for all subsequent reforms based on scientific principles.

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