A Keyhole for Roger Williams' Key; Or, A Study, of Suggested Misprints, in Its Sixteenth Chapter, "Of the Earth and the Fruits Thereof, &c.": A Paper Read Before the Rhode Island Historical Society

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Standard Printing Company, 1892 - Narragansett language - 41 pages
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Page 33 - Take thou also unto thee wheat, and barley, and beans, and lentiles, and millet, and fitches, and put them in one vessel, and make thee bread thereof...
Page 24 - Their corne being ripe, they gather it, and drying it hard in the sunne, conveigh it to their barnes, which be great holes digged in the ground in forme of a brasse pot, seeled with rinds of trees, wherein they put their corne...
Page 7 - for the yearly choosing of Assistants for the time to come...
Page 10 - Native amongst an hundred will kil them, because they have a tradition, that the Crow brought them at first an Indian Graine of Corne in one Eare and an Indian or French Beane in another, from the Great God Kautdntoumts field in the Southwest from whence they hold came all their Corne and beanes.
Page 10 - Lastly, it is famous that the Sowwest (Sowaniu) is the great Subject of their discourse. From thence their Traditions. There they say (at the Southwest) is the Court of their great God Cautantouwit; At the South-west are their Forefathers soules; to the South-west they goe themselves when they dye; From the South-west came their Corne.
Page 33 - Rogelim, brought beds, and basons, and earthen vessels, and wheat, and barley, and flour, and parched corn, and beans, and lentiles, and parched pulse, and honey, and butter, and sheep, and cheese of kine, for David, and for the people that were with him, to eat : for they said, The people is hungry, and weary, and thirsty, in the wilderness.
Page 5 - Why does the world minify our intelligence by depreciating our favorite article of diet, and express the ultimate extreme of mental pauperism by saying of him on whose intellect they would heap contempt, "He doesn't know beans"? [Laughter.] And it is within my recollection that there was a time when it was proposed to reconstruct the Union of the States, with New England left out. Why, I repeat it, the intense unpopularity of New England? For one thing, it seems to me, we are hated because of our...
Page 23 - ... with Catharres and other rootes, Indian beanes and Clamms. In the Summer they have all manner of Sea-fifh, with all forts of Berries. For the ordering of their victuals, they boile or roaft them, having large Kettles which they traded for with the French long...
Page 14 - ... refresh ourselves, which we readily did. All those of the village, except the women, who had at first taken flight, came to the bank of the river to receive us. Here they built us cabins, brought us wood to burn and provisions in abundance. For three days they feasted us constantly. The women now returned, brought us Indian corn, beans, flour and various kinds of fruits; and we, in return, made them other little presents, which they admired greatly. These Indians do not resemble those at the...
Page 24 - ... being ripe, they gather it, and drying it hard in the sunne, conveigh it to their barnes, which be great holes digged in the ground in forme of a brasse pot, seeled with rinds of trees, wherein they put their corne, covering it from the inquisitive search of their gurmandizing husbands, who would eate up both their allowed portion, and reserved seede, if they knew where to finde it.

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