A late discourse made in a solemne assembly of nobles and learned men at Montpellier in France; touching the cure of wounds by the powder of sympathy, rendred into Engl. by R. White

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Page 10 - This was presently reported to the Duke of Buckingham, and a little after to the King, who were both very curious to know the circumstance of the businesse, which was, that after dinner I took the garter out of the water, and put it to dry before a great fire. It was scarce dry, but Mr...
Page 9 - Howel did, who stood talking with a gentleman in a corner of my chamber, not regarding at all what I was doing ; but he started suddenly, as if he had found some strange alteration in himself. I asked him what he ailed? 'I know not what ails me...
Page 12 - Tuscany, the Duke said he would be very glad to learn it of him. It was the father of the great Duke who governs now. The Carmelite...
Page 12 - ... in the world to make experience of his secret, but he would do it with his own hands ; therefore he would have some of the powder ; which I delivered, instructing him in all the circumstances. Whereupon his majesty made sundry proofs whence he derived singular satisfaction.
Page 104 - Virgin, which she had alwayes near to the teaster of her bed, whereunto she bore great devotion. " I urged another of a woman who was brought to bed of a child all hairy, because of a portrait of St. John Baptist in the Wilderness, where he wore a coat of Camel's hair.
Page 3 - Sympathy, doth naturally, and without any magick, cure wounds without handling them, yea, without seeing of the patient ; I say I should be very sorry that it should be doubted, whether such a cure may effectually be performed or no. In matter of fact, the determination of existence, and truth of a thing, depends upon the report which our senses make us.
Page 77 - The scurf or farcy is a venomous and contagious humour within the body of a horse ; hang a toad about the neck of the horse in a little bag, and he will be cured infallibly ; the toad, which is the stronger poison, drawing to it the venom which was within the horse.
Page 79 - ... forth a little white lee (which I think they call ' the mother of the wine ') upon the surface of the wine, which continues in a kind of disorder till the flower of the vines be fallen ; and then, this agitation being ceased, all the wine returns to the same state as it was in before.
Page 79 - I believe this 298th line is quoted as frequently in converfation as any one in Hudibras. Mr. Addifon calls it a celebrated line, Spectator, No.
Page 104 - I told her sundry stories upon the subject, as that of the Queen of Ethiopia, who was delivered of a white boy, which was attributed to a picture of the Blessed Virgin, which she had alwayes near to the teaster of her bed, whereunto she bore great devotion.

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