A law dictionary and glossary: containing full definitions of the principal terms of the common and civil law : together with translations and explanations of the various technical phrases in different languages, occurring in the ancient and modern reports, and standard treatises : embracing, also, all the principal common and civil law maxims, Volume 2

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J.S. Voorhis, 1860 - Law
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Page 553 - No court will lend its aid to a man who founds his cause of action upon an immoral or an illegal act.
Page 150 - England," it is declared and enacted, that no freeman may be taken or imprisoned or be disseised of his freehold or liberties, or his free customs, or be outlawed or exiled, or in any manner destroyed, but by the lawful judgment of his peers, or by the law of the land.
Page 543 - Our constitution declares a treaty to be the law of the land. It is, consequently, to be regarded in courts of justice as equivalent to an act of the legislature, whenever it operates of itself without the aid of any legislative provision. But when the terms of the stipulation import a contract, when either of the parties engages to perform a particular act, the treaty addresses itself to the political, not the judicial department; and the legislature must execute the contract before it can become...
Page 132 - Municipal law, thus understood, is properly defined to be a 'rule of civil conduct prescribed by the supreme power in a state, commanding what is right and prohibiting what is wrong.
Page 522 - ... the sacrament of the Lord's supper, according to the usage of the Church of England...
Page 249 - No free man shall be taken or imprisoned or dispossessed, or outlawed, or banished, or in any way destroyed, nor will we go upon him, nor send upon him, except by the legal judgment of his peers or by the law of the land.
Page 509 - is a rate or sum of money assessed on the person or property of a citizen by government for the use of the nation or state.
Page 294 - Next to personal security, the law of England regards, asserts, and preserves the personal liberty of individuals. This personal liberty, consists in the power of locomotion, of changing situation, or moving one's person to whatsoever place one's own inclination may direct, without imprisonment or restraint, unless by due course of law.
Page 419 - Upon principle, every statute which takes away or impairs vested rights acquired under existing laws, or creates a new obligation, imposes a new duty, or attaches a new disability, in respect to transactions or considerations already past, must be deemed retrospective.
Page 220 - This natural liberty consists properly in a power of acting as one thinks fit, without any restraint or control, unless by the law of nature; being a right inherent in us by birth, and one of the gifts of God to man at his creation, when he endued him with the faculty of free will.

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