A Letter to C. B. Adderley on His Review of the Charge of the Recorder of Birmingham: On the Subject of Tickets of Leave

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Parker and son, 1856 - Parole - 24 pages
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Page 18 - I have been told so by the best of doctors ; but/ he added, with an air of stoical yet rueful resignation, that might have graced a man who sacrificed life to some mighty duty, ' Heaven's will be done ! I cannot live without fishing, and without wading I can never catch a fin.
Page 18 - ... his basket a flask with spirits of any kind, complaining, at the same time, of an attack of cramp in the stomach which gave him intolerable agony. This was supplied, with all the benevolence which should subsist between brothers of the angle, according to the instructions of their patriarch, Izaak Walton.
Page 22 - ... wit of man had exhausted all the possibilities of permutation. What course then remained for choice? None within the scope of my imagination, save two. First, such treatment as incapacitates the criminal from the commission of offences, leaving at the same time his appetites and passions unsubdued, and his desires unchanged ; or, secondly, a treatment which has for its object to reform him, by leading him to yearn after good instead of evil, and by so training his habits as that he shall be able...
Page 9 - A Letter to CB Adderley, on his review of the Charge of the Recorder of Birmingham, on the subject of tickets of leave, pp.
Page 22 - ... passions unsubdued, and his desires unchanged ; or, secondly, a treatment which has for its object to reform him, by leading him to yearn after good instead of evil, and by so training his habits as that he shall be able to give effect to his new aspirations. We are reduced, in short, to Incapacitation or to Reformation. Both these expedients, it must be admitted, are of very humble pretensions, when contrasted with the ambitious aims of deterrent punishment. Incapacitation limits itself to preventing...
Page 15 - Deterrents have a certain degree of power beyond all doubt ; and that the power, such as it exists, is of the kind indicated by the maxim is also freely admitted. But each expedient which that maxim suggests has been tried in every possible form ; and the state of crime in all ages and in all countries abundantly supports me in asserting that deterrents, however...
Page 15 - ... that deterrents, however used, whether in large or small doses, whether at once or with repetitions extended over a long period, are but weak agents, and cannot be relied upon for an efficacious repression of crime.

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