A Letter to Henry Brougham, Esq. M.P. on Certain Clauses in the Education Bills Now Before Parliament

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W. Eddowes and sold by Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme and Brown, 1820 - Education - 24 pages
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Page 1 - Then the officers of the children of Israel came and cried unto Pharaoh, saying, Wherefore dealest thou thus with thy servants? There is no straw given unto thy servants, and they say to us, Make brick: and, behold, thy servants are beaten; but the fault is in thine own people.
Page 3 - Majesty's subjects," which was imbued with a spirit of illiberality and intolerance which would have disgraced the darkest ages of the Christian era. The following were some of its leading provisions. " 1st. No person is capable of being elected as Schoolmaster by the Parish, who does not produce a certificate...
Page 4 - By a clause in the bill entilled, " a Bill for Improving the Administration of Endowments connected with Education, and for the better fulfilling the Intentions of the Founders thereof," it is declared and enacted, that the person or persons having the power of appointing the master of any school founded or endowed for the teaching of GRAMMAR, and who shall have appointed such master, may, if he or they think fit, make a bargain with the said master, as they can agree together, by force of which...
Page 5 - ... bargain with the said master, as they can agree together, by force of which he shall bind himself to teach either by himself, or an usher, or assistant, reading, writing, and accounts, to such persons, and on such terms, as shall be agreed upon, besides teaching grammar, according to the instructions and directions of the founder, grantor, devisor, or testator. By the next clause " That it shall and may be lawful for the person or persons having the appointment of the master of such grammar school...
Page 20 - ... corrupted? If so, Sir, I beseech you to consider how great and valuable a portion of society you deprive of benefits, of which they have themselves participated, and which they have a right to expect for their children, for the sake of one class only, who can be better and more essentially benefited by instruction given them in schools appropriated for that purpose. Consider, Sir, what a numerous body of gentry, lawyers, medical men, merchants, naval and military officers, respectable tradesmen,...
Page 20 - ... writing-, and accounts, — in other words, Parish schools. They will know and feel, without the least ill-will or disrespect to the lowest order of society, that their children can learn no improvements in manners or morals by associating with all the lowest boys of the parish, and they will feel it necessary and inevitable, to forego one of these two advantages, either the preservation of their children's minds from the contagion of vulgar example, or the benefits of an institution which they...
Page 20 - Would he not, if obliged obliged to chuse one of these alternatives, as undoubtedly he must, rather forego the benefits of the foundation, than receive them at the risk of his child's moral habits becoming corrupted? If so, Sir, I beseech you to consider how great and valuable a portion of society you deprive of benefits, of which they have themselves participated, and which they have a right to expect for their children, for the sake of one class only, who can be better and more essentially benefited...
Page 5 - ... it shall and may be lawful for the person or persons having the appointment of the master of such grammar school as aforesaid, as often as the place of such master shall be vacant, from and after the passing of this act, to order and require that the person to be appointed shall, without any farther consideration, teach by himself, or by an usher, or assistant, reading, writing, and accounts...
Page 13 - Grammar schools that they should be wholly confined to boys on the foundation. That it was not so at the school over which I myself preside, I can prove by the most satisfactory evidence : I can prove that the very person who drew up our statutes to be approved by our principal founder, and which were approved accordingly, admitted foundation boys and strangers indiscriminately and without limitation ; for we still have the lists in his own hand-writing.
Page 18 - Schools appears to have been to diffuse as widely as possible the attainment of learning, by affording in most cases gratuitous, or at least cheap means of instruction in those languages, a knowledge of which is indispensable for academic education and the liberal professions. While the probability was, that what are generally called the middle classes of society would chiefly take advantage of these institutions, there was no exclusion either of the highest or lowest. But common sense evidently...

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