A Letter to William Wilbeforce, Vice President of the African Institution, &c. &c. &c., Containing Remarks on the Reports of the Sierra Leone Company, and African Institution: With Hints Respecting the Means by which an Universal Abolition of the Slave Trade Might be Carried Into Effect

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F.C. and J. Rivington, 1815 - Antislavery movements - 84 pages
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Page 28 - ... manner since I can remember; And in case the said Annie H. Ide shall neglect or contravene either of the above conditions, I hereby revoke the donation and transfer my rights in the said birthday to the President of the United States of America for the time being: In witness whereof I have hereto set my hand and seal this nineteenth day of June in the year of grace eighteen hundred and ninety-one.
Page 74 - February 1810, declared his determination to co-operate with his Britannic Majesty in the cause of humanity and justice, by adopting the most efficacious means for bringing about a gradual Abolition of the Slave Trade...
Page 74 - Portugal, being feljy convinced of the injustice and impolicy of the Slave Trade, and of the great disadvantages which arise from the necessity of introducing and continually renewing a foreign and factitious population for the purpose of labour and industry within his South American dominions, has resolved to co-operate with His Britannic Majesty in the cause of humanity and justice, by adopting the most efficacious means for bringing about a, gradual Abolition of the Slave Trade throughout the...
Page 74 - ... of the Slave Trade, throughout the whole. of his dominions. And, actuated by this principle, his royal highness the Prince Regent of Portugal engages, that his subjects shall not be permitted to carry on the Slave Trade on any part of the coast of Africa, not actually belonging to his royal highness's dominions, in which that trade has been discontinued and abandoned by the powers and states of Europe which formerly traded there; reserving, however, to his own subjects, the right of purchasing...
Page 45 - I mention it therefore on two accounts : Firsl, that the friends of Africa may recollect the true nature and effects of Abolition. They must remember, that it does not actually set us forward one step in our course. It removes an artificial barrier which could not otherwise have been forced ; but all the natural obstacles to the improvement of a savage people remain as great as ~ ever. Secondly, that warm and unthinking people may be cautioned against a disappointment that might lead to unfortunate...
Page 47 - ... about the taste the Africans have acquired for European commodities, there is little reason to expect they will exert themselves, in the way of regular industry, in order to obtain those commodities. I rather think that they will sink back to their former state, which is still the state of the natives two or three hundred miles inland. They will weave their own cloth, raise their own tobacco, smelt their own iron, and resume their bows and arrows. Be it remembered, that the greatest demand for...
Page 42 - To finish all, — this great good, as in the instant it is, contains in it the seeds of all further improvement, and may be considered as in a regular ^progress, because founded on similar principles, towards the stable excellence of a British Constitution.
Page 75 - Parties agree in declaring, that all vessels built in the Dominions of His Britannic Majesty, and owned, navigated, and registered according to the laws of Great Britain...
Page 45 - Abolition of itself will not prevent the Africans from still remaining a savage and uncivilized people. To abolish the Slave Trade is not to abolish the violent passions which now find vent in that particular direction. Were it to cease, the misery of Africa would arise from other causes ; but it does not follow that Africa would be less miserable : she might even be less miserable, and yet be savage and uncivilized. This will doubtless be acknowledged : and it may be asked why I repeat so obvious...
Page 45 - ... much nearer the truth to affirm, that a self-interested intercourse will take place; and that injuries, retaliations, WARS AND CONQUESTS, will be the natural effects of any intercourse. That civilization will follow conquests, I more readily allow...

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