A Letter to the Honourable James Abercromby, M.P.

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William Blackwood, 1822 - Justice, Administration of - 31 pages
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Page 3 - into the conduct of the Lord Advocate and the other law officers of the Crown in Sco'tland, with relation to the public press, and more especially to inquire into the prosecution carried on against WM Borthwick.
Page 24 - It is very possible that the wilful misrepresentation of others may have induced you to think yourselves (Mr. Abercrombie and Sir James Mackintosh) safe in the grounds of that attack ; but, (whosoever was the author of your information,) that the circumstances in question have been anxiously, or, at least, hastily, and therefore unwarrantably, seized hold of, for the purpose of imputing my official conduct to flagitious motives, cannot be denied. Whether you truly believed the statements, which you...
Page 23 - On the gross injustice of a defamer's availing himself of the privileges of Parliament, in order to aid the private action of a political assassin, and to prejudice the minds of the public against an individual, it is needless to make any observations.' 'It is very possible that the wilful misrepresentation of others may have induced you to think yourselves (Mr. Abercrombie and Sir James Mackintosh) safe in the grounds of that attack...
Page 7 - The answers of the respondents were these : " The respondents generally deny the truth of the libel. They affirm that the statements in the newspaper complained of are true. They offer to prove, by the evidence of persons of high character and skill in the laws and practice of honour, that the conduct, of the pursuer, in regard to the affair with Mr Stevenson, was most ungentlemanly, and deserving of every condemnation.
Page 29 - Borthwick at his own instance, as private prosecutor. From that time the prosecution against Borthwick was at the instance of the private party alone, and was no longer under the control, direction, or management of the Public Prosecutor.
Page 3 - ... had, doubtless, been prepared with great deliberation, it has since been published, from under your own hand, in almost all the newspapers in the kingdom, and, it is, therefore, a fair object of close and severe criticism. I have, indeed, seen, in the True Briton, a publication, purporting to be a speech, delivered by you, in the House of Commons, on the 25th ultimo; in which speech, the editor makes you say, in reference to the address above quoted, that it had about it, perhaps, some unseasonable...
Page 7 - ... undeserving of the satisfaction of a gentleman, and we would desire to hold him up to the unalloyed opprobrium of mankind. Whether the Beacon indulged in a superabundant quantity of personal hostility towards Mr Stuart, subsequently to his affray with Mr Stevenson, we shall leave the world to determine. But this we will observe, that, from the way in which Mr Stuart conducted himself, he could not have been too severely...
Page 27 - iS A CHARGE, WHICH, IF THE PRIVATE PARTY APPLIES, MUST BE TAKEN UP AT THE PUBLIC INSTANCE.
Page 7 - They offered to prove that the facts stated in the alleged libel were true : — They offered to justify the libel.

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