A Life of Edmund Burke

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G. Bell & Sons, 1891 - 545 pages
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Page 549 - English Revolution of 1640. From the Accession of Charles I. to his Death. Trans, by W. Hazlitt. Portrait. History of Civilisation. From the Roman Empire to the French Revolution.
Page 143 - Though equal to all things, for all things unfit, Too nice for a statesman, too proud for a wit : For a patriot, too cool ; for a drudge, disobedient ; And too fond of the right to pursue the expedient. In short, 'twas his fate, unemploy'd, or in place, Sir, To eat mutton cold, and cut blocks with a razor.
Page 141 - Do not burthen them by taxes ; you were not used to do so from the beginning. Let this be your reason for not taxing. These are the arguments of states and kingdoms. Leave the rest to the schools ; for there only they may be discussed with safety.
Page 91 - ... a cabinet so variously inlaid; such a piece of diversified mosaic; such a tessellated pavement without cement; here a bit of black stone and there a bit of white; patriots and courtiers; king's friends and republicans; Whigs and Tories; treacherous friends and open enemies; that it was indeed a very curious show, but utterly unsafe to touch, and unsure to stand on.
Page 516 - ... order ; but when the high roads are broken up, and the waters out, when a new and troubled scene is opened, and the file affords no precedent, then it is that a greater knowledge of- mankind, and a far more extensive comprehension of things, is requisite, than ever office gave, or than office can ever give.

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