A Lover of the Chair

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Marshall Jones Company, 1919 - Men - 303 pages
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Page 211 - Puerilis,' got by heart almost the entire vocabulary of Latin and French primitives and words, could make congruous syntax, turn English into Latin, and vice versa, construe and prove what he read, and did the government and use of relatives, verbs, substantives, ellipses, and many figures and tropes, and made a considerable progress in Comenius's Janua; began himself to write legibly, and had a strong passion for Greek.
Page 211 - Plautus in one's hand, he asked what book it was, and, being told it was comedy, and too difficult for him, he wept for sorrow. Strange was his apt and ingenious application of fables and morals ; for he had read...
Page 287 - Nor did I deem Your ordinance of so much binding force, As that a mortal man could overbear The unchangeable unwritten code of Heaven; This is not of today and yesterday, But lives forever, having origin Whence no man knows: whose sanctions I were loath In Heaven's sight to provoke, fearing the will Of any man.
Page 211 - English, Latine, French, or Gottic letters, pronouncing the three first languages exactly. He had before the 5th yeare, or in that yeare, not onely skill to reade most written hands, but to decline all the nouns, conjugate the verbs regular, and most of the irregular ; learn'd out Puerilis...
Page 210 - ... of mind of incredible and rare hopes. To give onely a little taste of some of them, and thereby glory to God, who out of the mouths of babes...
Page 107 - ... reason why I was so eager to avoid a comparison of ideals and a comparison of perfections. Aristocracy, based upon sordid reality, would, in such comparisons, seem dull and grey beside the glowing colours, the moving ideality of the democratic faith. I could hope but little to touch your sympathies. "This, however, is by the way. What I wish to point out is the underlying fact — that democracy is based on ideals and aristocracy on realities — that democracy builds upon its ideals, and aristocracy...
Page 260 - But however time had mollified the militant combativeness of his rationalism, he never again lost his rational point of view. For him, therefore, whose vague notion of education was at the other extreme from the practical, and whose religion had weakened and died, and whose traditions were so at a loss beyond the pale of vocation and religion, the situation would have seemed dire had he not in his youth and inexperience put so implicit a faith in the identity of the college with that secular inner...
Page 266 - Broseley's churchwardens, and midnights of wildest metaphysics when even the dormitory lay in silence; and late strolls on the lake shore where the glare of distant iron mills dimmed the stars and cast a ghostly light on the breakers that roared at their feet. Through it all ran the stirrings of generous friendship, which had for a time at least the virtue of being enough. Even long afterwards, so whole was the sufficiency of this aspect of their lives in spite of the haunting misery of their more...
Page 135 - One of you has mentioned the aristocratic disbelief in our ability to maintain this discipline. Democracy is, we may agree with him, immeasurably harder to maintain than an aristocracy. • It has a people trained to wider interests than the lower classes of an aristocracy, a people less compactly organized, more restless, more shifting. And to govern them it has no class set apart, trained to rule, stimulated by selfish incentives, rewarded by honor and privilege.
Page 256 - The time came when the moment could hold no more; and when he finally moved from the spot it was a movement into the future. That he moved forward was a confession of faith, a confession of his anxiety to be taken care of. Above everything else he needed to be taken care of, for he had responded, with an innocence that made his abandon dangerous, to many of the subtle whisperings of the time spirit, and...

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