A Manual of Mending and Repairing: With Diagrams

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Dodd, Mead and Company, 1896 - Repairing - 264 pages
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Page 120 - ... articles, which, if they do not destroy, at least they soil, as they frequently deposit a drop of their excrement where they settle, and, some way or other, by that means damage what they cannot devour. They fly into the flame of candles, and sometimes into the dishes ; are very fond of ink and of oil, into which they are apt to fall and perish. In...
Page 119 - One of them is a species of what are commonly designated "fish bugs," "silver fish," " bristle tails," etc. By entomologists they are called Lepisma ; the species in hand is probably Lepisma saccharina. It is a small, elongate, silvery, very active creature, frequently discovered under objects, or between the leaves of books, whence it escapes by its extraordinary quickness of movement. Paste and the sizing or enamel of some kinds of paper are very attractive to it. In some cases it eats off the...
Page 118 - ... somewhat like shot-holes externally, passed through the leather, enlarging and ramifying in the interior. As if made by smaller insects, the sides of these holes were neater and cleaner cuttings than those in the burrows on the edges of the other volumes. "The insects were all identified as well-known enemies of libraries, cabinets, and wardrobes. One of them is a species of what are commonly designated ' fish bugs,' ' silver fish/ ' bristle tails,
Page 120 - Exterminator,' made by Barnard & Co., 7 Temple Place, Boston, and, without other interest in advertising the compound, have found it entirely satisfactory in its effects. Bisulphide carbon, evaporated in closed boxes or cases containing the infested articles, is used to do away with the 'Buffalo Bugs.
Page 118 - ... Cambridge, for his care and obse'rvation. From him I learn that the principal offender is an animal known popularly as the Buffalo Bug, though he is helped in his work by kindred spirits, not allied to him according to the rules of natural history. Mr. Garman's letter gives the result of his...
Page 120 - Drury, fly out in the evening and commit monstrous depredations ; they plunder and erode all kinds of victuals, dressed and undressed ; and damage all sorts of clothing, especially those which are touched with powder, pomatum, and similar substances, every thing made of leather, books, paper, and various other articles, which, if they do not destroy, at least they soil.
Page 116 - ... Samuel A. Green, after showing two volumes that had been completely riddled by the ravages of insects, as well as some specimens of the animals in various stages, made the following remarks : — For a long period of years I have been looking for living specimens of the so - called " book - worm," of which traces are occasionally found in old volumes ; and I was expecting to find an invertebrate animal of the class of annelids. In this library at the present time there are books perforated with...
Page 117 - ... straight. From a long examination of the subject I am inclined to think that all the damage was done before the library came to this site in the spring of 1833. At all events, there is no reason to suppose that any of the mischief has been caused during the last fifty years. Perhaps the furnace heat dries up the moisture which is a requisite condition for the life and propagation of the little animal. Nearly two years ago I received a parcel of books from Florida, of which some were infested...
Page 116 - February 9, 1893, Dr. Samuel A. Green, after showing two volumes that had been completely riddled by the ravages of insects, as well as some specimens of the animals in various stages, made the following remarks : — For a long period of years I have been looking for living specimens of the so-called
Page 212 - This brought them to a flame color, in which the modeling had been made. They next attacked the robe of the Virgin Mary ; and having taken away the crimson lake, were astonished to find a greenish drab. When they had thus in turn removed every color in the picture, dissecting every part by diligent care, loosening every glaze...

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