A Manual of Phonography; Or, Writing by Sound: a Natural Method of Writing by Signs that Represent the Spoken Sounds: Adapted to the English Language as a Complete System of Phonetic Short Hand

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F. Pitman, 1849 - Shorthand - 72 pages
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Page 46 - Press, blest alliance ! combined To soften the heart and enlighten the mind ; For that to the treasures of Knowledge gave birth, And this sent them forth to the ends of the earth ; Their battles for truth were triumphant indeed, And the rod of the tyrant was snapped like a reed ; They were made to exalt us, to teach us, to bless ; Those invincible brothers, the Pen and the Press...
Page 46 - And, oh ! what a glorious thing it became ! For it spoke to the world in a language of flame ; While its master wrote on, like a being inspired, Till the hearts of the millions were melted or fired : It came as a boon and a blessing to men, — The peaceful, the pure, the victorious Pen.
Page 46 - Genius walked out by the mountains and streams, Entranced by the power of his own pleasant dreams, Till the silent, the wayward, the wandering thing Found a plume that had fallen from a passing bird's wing: Exulting and proud, like a boy at his play, He bore the new prize to his dwelling away; He gazed for a while on its beauties, and then He cut it, and shaped it, and called it a PEN. But its magical use he discovered...
Page 46 - Found a plume that had fallen from a passing bird's wing: Exulting and proud, like a boy at his play, He bore the new prize to his dwelling away; He gazed for a while on its beauties, and then He cut it, and shaped it, and called it a PEN. But its magical use he discovered not yet, Till he dipped its bright lips in a fountain of jet; And, oh ! what a glorious thing it became ! For it spoke to the world in a language of flame ; While its master wrote on, like...
Page 26 - ... no difficulty in writing them quickly ; but if he lets his anxiety to write fast overcome his resolution to write well, he will not only be longer in attaining real swiftness, but will always have to lament the illegibility of his writing.
Page 9 - ... every known language might probably be effectually reduced to writing, so as to preserve an exact correspondence between the writing and pronunciation; which would be one of the most valuable acquisitions not only to philologists but to mankind, facilitating the intercourse...
Page 27 - ... and thus, not only is the memory not burdened with a multitude of signs, but the mind perceives that a thin stroke corresponds with a light articulation, and a thick stroke with a heavy articulation Tho vowels are arranged naturally in two series, palatal and labial.
Page 60 - ON IMPROVEMENT. ESTABLISHMENTS for improvement, and for knowledge-in-general, are very important things in a kingdom ; and the more so where it-is usual with-them to represent and acknowledge good principles. A Phonographic establishment in particular, is not-only an immediate advantage to every gentleman who-is a member of-it, but to all. According to general opinion, Phonography is a subject we should all have pleasure in, and think upon : withont-it, language is not what-it-should-be — a remark...
Page 13 - ... becomes perplexed Digraphs must be looked upon as single letters quite as much as the single letters themselves ; for they have not the value of a combination of letters, but of one letter. Viewed in this light, the English alphabet will be found to consist, not of twenty-six...
Page 46 - ... pure, the victorious Pen! Young Genius went forth on his rambles once more, The vast, sunless caverns of earth to explore; He searched the rude rock, and with rapture he found A substance unknown, which he brought from the ground...

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