A Manual of Pottery and Porcelain for American Collectors

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Putnam, 1872 - Pottery - 161 pages
 

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Page 73 - an earthen cup," he says, " turned and enamelled with so much beauty, that from that time I entered into controversy with my own thoughts, recalling to mind several suggestions that some people had made to me in fun, when I was painting portraits. Then, seeing that these were falling out of request in the country where I dwelt, and that glass-painting was...
Page 71 - Gothic designs of the coloured windows of his cathedral, He knew that this glass, which allowed the sunbeams to pass into the church, and exhibited the wonderful scenes of the Bible and the Gospel, consisted only of earth and sand most carefully tempered by the hand of man, purified and hardened in the fire, and made transparent as rock-crystal by processes resembling magic. From that day, the earth he loved so well seemed to him mere mud : his imagination put before him a wonder to imitate and other...
Page 98 - A fine black porcelain, having nearly the same properties as the basattes, resisting the attacks of acids, being a touchstone to copper, silver, and gold, and equal in hardness to agate or porphyry.
Page 128 - Binns, the ingenious manager of the works, " no other artificial porcelain of the period can be compared to it, either for closeness of texture, translucency of paste, or perfect homogeneous union with the glaze. The latter is a distinguishing feature of Worcester porcelain.
Page 76 - When I had dwelt with my regrets a little, because there was no one who had pity upon me, I said to my soul, ' Wherefore art thou saddened, since thou hast found the object of thy search ? Labour now, and the defamers will live to be ashamed.' But my spirit said again, ' You have no means wherewith to continue this affair; how will you feed your family, and buy whatever things are requisite to pass over the four or five months which must elapse before you can enjoy the produce of your...
Page 26 - Was thought to represent immortal life, expressed by an hero entering the gate of Elysium, conducted by divine love, and received by immortality.
Page 32 - ... which secured to them the commerce of the known world. The boundary of these Semitic dialects was the Tigris, if we except another language of the same origin which appears to have prevailed in Assyria, properly so called. On the farther side of that river began the Persian dialects, so far differing from the Semitic, not only in their vocabulary and phraseology, but also in their elements and construction, that it is impossible to consider them as belonging to the same race.
Page 115 - called nisikite, is only made at one factory, which possesses the secret of mixing and preparing this and other enamel colors., as well as silver and gold. The process is not allowed to be divulged. The blue porcelain of Japan differs from that of Nankin. The blue designs upon the latter appear upon the surface of the glaze, whereas those of the former seem absorbed in the paste under the glaze. This is owing to the more vitreous composition of the Nankin glaze.
Page 72 - ... windows of his cathedral, He knew that this glass, which allowed the sunbeams to pass into the church, and exhibited the wonderful scenes of the Bible and the Gospel, consisted only of earth and sand most carefully tempered by the hand of man, purified and hardened in the fire, and made transparent as rock-crystal by processes resembling magic. From that day, the earth he loved so well seemed to him mere mud : his imagination put before him a wonder to imitate and other wonders to discover. He...

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