A Manual of Practical Charity: How to Get Help; Designed for the Use of Non-professional Workers Among the Poor

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Ronald Press, 1906 - Charity - 371 pages
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Page 91 - As you are now so once was I; As I am now, so you must be Prepare for death and follow me.
Page 310 - Working people live in the same streets with those in need of charity, but they themselves, so long as they have health and good wages, require and want none of it.
Page 262 - I had been connected with the Children's Aid Society but a short time when many avenues of work opened up before me, and it was quite perplexing to see how to make my relations to the various children I became acquainted with real and vital. Among other things the children ought to have the benefit of good reading and to become lovers of good books. Indeed, a great many things needed to be done for and by the children. Out of this opportunity and need the Home Library was evolved. "A little bookcase...
Page 230 - States unless: (a) They are physically able to work and have secured in advance a definite assurance of the opportunity to perform work of a proper character at wages sufficient for their suitable support: or, (b) Unless they have at their disposal at least $250 in addition to railroad fare.
Page 55 - Divinity hath wisely divided the act thereof into many branches, and hath taught us in this narrow way many paths unto goodness: as many ways as we may do good, so many ways we may be charitable.
Page 306 - ... politician who sells one by one to the highest bidder all the offices in his grasp, will not be considered more base in his code of morals, more hardened in his practice, than the woman who constantly invites to her receptions those alone who bring her an equal social return, who shares her beautiful surroundings only with those who minister to a liking she has for successful social events. In doing this is she not just as unmindful of the common weal, as unscrupulous in her use of power, as...
Page 163 - Recognizing the tentative character of such an estimate, it may be worth while to record the opinion that in New York city, where rentals and provisions are, perhaps, more expensive than in any other large city, for an average family of five persons the minimum income on which it is practicable to remain self-supporting, and to maintain any approach to a decent standard of living, is $600 a year.
Page 306 - The time may come when the politician who sells one by one to the highest bidder all the offices in his grasp, will not be considered more base in his code of morals, more hardened in his practice, than the woman who constantly invites to her receptions those alone who bring her an equal social return, who shares her beautiful surroundings only with those who minister to a liking she has for successful social events. In doing this is she not just as unmindful of the common weal, as unscrupulous in...
Page 100 - And on the morrow when he departed, he took out two pence, and gave them to the host, and said unto him, Take care of him; and whatsoever thou spendest more, when I come again, I will repay thee.
Page 162 - For the great mass of unskilled workingmen, however, residing in towns and cities with a population of from five thousand to one hundred thousand, the fair wage, a wage consistent with American standards of living, should not be less than $600 a year. Less than this would, in my judgment, be insufficient to give to the -\vorkingrnan those necessaries and comforts and those small luxuries which are now considered essential.

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