A Manual of the Cultivation of the Grasses and Forage Plants at the South

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Walker, Evans & Cogswell, printers, 1875 - Agriculture - 30 pages
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Page 23 - ... moisten them with water, and place them one upon the other in the bottom of a saucer. Place any number of seeds which it is desired to try upon the cloth, spreading thin, so as not to allow them to cover or touch each other. Cover them over with a third piece of cloth, similar to the others, and moistened in the same manner. Then place the saucer in a moderately warm place. Sufficient water must be turned on, from time to time, to keep the three thicknesses of cloth moist, but great care must...
Page 15 - ... herbaceous, lower one convex on the back, or compressed, keeled, five to nine nerved ; awned or bristle-pointed from below the tip; upper palea at length adhering to the groove of the oblong grain; fringed on the keel; stamens three; styles attached below the apex of the ovary. The grasses of this genus are coarse, with large spikelets, somewhat drooping generally when ripe.
Page 16 - ... remain devoid of vegetation. It is esteemed one of the most valuable of our grasses, either in the pasture or cured as hay. Col. TC Howard, of Georgia, says: The desideratum to the South is a grass that is perennial, nutritions, and adapted to the climate. While -wo have grasses and forage plants that do well when nursed. we have few that live and thrive here as in their native habitat.
Page 16 - South is a grass that is perennial, nutritions, and adapted to the climate. While -wo have grasses and forage plants that do well when nursed. we have few that live and thrive here as in their native habitat. The Bermuda and Crab grasses are at home in the South. They not only live, but live in spite of neglect, and when petted and encouraged they make such grateful returns as astonish the benefactor.
Page 18 - These are mostly grasses of a rather coarse structure, and are chiefly valuable before they send up their flowering stalks, which are usually harsh and innutritions. Mr. CW Howard, in his treatise " On the Cultivation of the Grasses and Forage Plants at the South...
Page 15 - ... grasses, says he has found "no difficulty in destroying it upon the uplands of Georgia by close cultivation in cotton for two years. When not pastured broom grass or briers soon destroy it." He also thinks it very doubtful whether "there is one acre of land in the South thoroughly set with Bermuda grass that is not worth more than any other crop that can be grown on it.
Page 15 - Take advantage of the dry, hot months of summer to have the grass that may be found alive plowed and hoed, and exposed as much as possible to the sun. In ordinary seasons so much of the grass will be killed the first year that but little interference with the next crop need be apprehended. Bermuda is essentially a southern, summer-pasture grass, and as such possesses superior qualities. It will thrive upon poor soil and stand the heat and drought of summer. It is nutritious and is eaten by all kinds...
Page 15 - At the end of that time, he had twenty-five head of cattle, seventy[ five hogs, and five horses. I offered him for his increase $1,000 which he refused. So much for the grazing value of Bermuda grass. I cannot give you a better illustration of the manurial value of this grass, than by reference to the crops made on this same thirty acres of land, after the man referred to had left the placeFirst crop, cotton.
Page 16 - ... eight to ten of wheat. I know of no crop that will improve land more, and certainly none that will, at the same time, give so large an income with so little labor.
Page 14 - When cut before the seed stems shoot up they make a coarse but nutritions hay. It may be cut three or four times during the season. The quantity of forage which can be made from it is enormous. Both cattle and horses are fond of the hay. The roots are almost as large and strong as cane roots. It would require a team of four to six...

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