A Manual of Weathercasts: Comprising Storm Prognostics on Land and Sea; with an Explanation of the Method in Use at the Meteorological Office. Adapted for All Countries

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G. Routledge and Sons, 1866 - Meteorology - 208 pages
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Page 90 - The sun also ariseth, and the sun goeth down, and hasteth to his place where he arose. The wind goeth toward the south, and turneth about unto the north; it whirleth about continually, and the wind returneth again according to his circuits. All the rivers run into the sea ; yet the sea is not full ; unto the place from whence the rivers come, thither they return again.
Page 141 - The hollow winds begin to blow, The clouds look black, the glass is low ; The soot falls down, the spaniels sleep, And spiders from their cobwebs peep. Last night the sun went pale to bed, The moon in halos hid her head ; The boding shepherd heaves a sigh, For see ! a rainbow spans the sky.
Page 100 - The hollow winds begin to blow. The clouds look black, the glass is low, The soot falls down, the spaniels sleep, And spiders from their cobwebs peep. Last mght the sun went pale to bed, The moon in halos hid her head. The boding shepherd heaves a sigh. For, see! a rainbow spans the sky, The walls are damp, the ditches smell. Closed is the pink-eyed pimpernel.
Page 123 - After fine clear weather, the first signs in the sky of a coming change are usually light streaks, curls, wisps, or mottled patches of white distant clouds, which increase and are followed by an overcasting of murky vapour that grows into cloudiness.
Page 119 - He answered and said unto them, When it is evening, ye say, It will be fair weather : for the sky is red.
Page 47 - If St. Paul's Day be fair and clear, It does betide a happy year ; But if it chance to snow or rain, Then will be dear all...
Page 141 - Loud quack the ducks, the sea-fowl cry ; The distant hills are looking nigh ; How restless are the snorting swine ! The busy flies disturb the kine. Low o'er the grass the swallow wings ; The cricket too, how sharp he sings ! Puss on the hearth, with velvet paws, Sits wiping o'er her whiskered jaws.
Page 92 - But if it move contrary to the motion of the sun, that is if it changes from east to north, from north to west, from west to south, from south to east, it generally returns to the former quarter, at least before it has completed the entire circle.
Page 141 - THE hollow winds begin to blow ; The clouds look black, the glass is low ; The soot falls down ; the spaniels sleep ; And spiders from their cobwebs peep.
Page 137 - A swarm of bees in May is worth a load of hay. A swarm of bees in June is worth a silver spoon. A swarm of bees in July is not worth a fly.

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