A Memoir of James Jackson, Jr., M.D.: With Extracts from His Letters to His Father; and Medical Cases, Collected by Him

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I.R. Butts, 1835 - Physicians - 444 pages
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Page 23 - We are our own lawgivers, or rather we must discover the laws, on which our profession rests. We must discover them, and not invent them ; for the laws of nature are not to be invented. And who is to discover these laws ? Who should be a diligent observer of nature for this purpose, if not the son of a physician, who has himself experienced the difficulties of the observation of disease, who knows how few minds are fitted for it, and how few have, at once, the talents and inclination, requisite for...
Page 60 - Russia, after he had gone through the usual course of professional education. Returning to France at the age of thirty-two, he was about to engage in private practice. He was then led to examine anew the state of the science of medicine, and was dissatisfied with it. He now decided to abandon the thoughts of practice for a time, and to devote himself to observation ; that is, to the study of disease as it actually presents itself. With this view he went into the hospital la Charite in Paris, and...
Page 88 - PARIS, NOVEMBER 28, 1831. I am still following at la Pitie. I have made two, or three efforts to follow Chomel at Hotel Dieu; — but it is impossible to do so with advantage. One may hear the clinique to be sure, and a very good one too ; but he cannot see the patients. This, especially in my present situation, is the most important by far. My great object is to accustom my ear to stethoscopic sounds ; in order to this I must see the patients.
Page 25 - ... again from Paris. It is now the first moment of my life, that I have heen placed between two duties, each strong, each binding, and where my difficulty is to decide which is the most so. But I have decided, — as I know, against your wishes. God grant that circumstances may be such that you shall accord with me, when the time is passed. A medical man has his duties; — I am a boy in medicine; — granted. But I am like the other Americans here about me. An opportunity is offered us of studying...
Page 55 - Because in this country his course would have been so singular, as in a measure to separate him from other men. We are a business doing people. We are new. We have, as it were, but just landed on these uncultivated shores ; there is a vast deal to be done ; and he who will not be doing, must be set down as a drone.
Page 130 - As soon as tuberculous matter is 17 129 deposited, there exists a solid material around the bronchia, which will transmit the sound made by the passage of the air through these tubes ; — but thus early a great portion of the lung, even in the part affected, (the summit,) is permeable to the air; and therefore the murmur of vesicular expansion, on inspiration, entirely masks the sound of the air passing through the bronchia, which would otherwise have been transmitted through the surrounding denser...
Page 59 - ... the study of medicine. This is nothing else than the method of induction, the method of Bacon, so much vaunted and yet so little regarded. But, if so, where is the novelty ? If any one, after patiently studying and practising the method proposed by M. Louis, denies the novelty of it, I will not dispute with him a moment. Perhaps he will then agree with me, that it is a novelty to pursue the method of Bacon thoroughly and truly in the study of medicine ; though it is not new to talk of it and...
Page 20 - I had remarked these characteristics in him, before I knew who he was. Soon afterwards, learning that he would ere long return to Boston, I pointed out to him the advantage it would be for science and for himself, if he would devote several years exclusively to the observation of diseases. I now retain the same opinion and am strengthened in it ; for the more I become acquainted with, and the more I notice him applying himself to observation, the more am I persuaded that he is fitted to render real...
Page 138 - While he remained in Paris during the prevalence of this frightful disease, he gave up his whole time to its study. Retiring to England about the last of April, he there digested his observations upon sixty of the cases which he had examined, of which thirty were favorable and thirty...
Page 26 - Paris rose to eight hundred a day, within three weeks from the first appearance of the disease. It was in the Hotel Dieu my son first saw the victims of it in any number, and the emphatic words in which he described it were nearly the same, as were often used by others.

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