A Memoir of James Jackson, Jr., M.D.: With Extracts from His Letters to His Father; and Medical Cases, Collected by Him

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I.R. Butts, 1835 - Physicians - 444 pages
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Page 55 - Because in this country his course would have been so singular, as in a measure to separate him from other men. We are a business doing people. We are new. We have, as it were, but just landed on these uncultivated shores ; there is a vast deal to be done ; and he who will not be doing, must be set down as a drone.
Page 12 - I shall not therefore allow myself to be anxious ; and it is more to tell you this, than to insinuate any cautions, that I have been led into this long statement of my views and feelings. In temptation, I think you will first think of home, — and then cast your eyes higher, to the home we all ultimately hope for, and to the Father who is better than any earthly parent. I referred to the dangers of society ; — I wish to add, that among men of the world, and I may say such gentlemen as a traveller...
Page 25 - ... large numbers, and assumed within one week the most terrific aspect ; such as to excite within that short period the most outrageous mobs, under a belief that the poorer classes had been designedly poisoned. On the sudden outbreak of this most alarming disease, my son's mind was exercised in the most distressing manner. The following extract from his letter of April 8th, which will be given in full among his letters, will describe his feelings, and give the result to which he was brought in this...
Page 14 - ... spectator of these majestic works of the Deity in the natural world around us. My heart has been warmed with a sense of his benevolence, and my mind opened anew and more strongly, to a conviction of his power and greatness. " ' In anticipating my future career in life, my mind is filled with what ? 1 can tell you, for I have spent much time during the last three months, in a serious consideration of the subject, and feel that I have arrived at somewhat more definite views than I had previously...
Page 88 - PARIS, NOVEMBER 28, 1831. I am still following at la Pitie. I have made two, or three efforts to follow Chomel at Hotel Dieu; — but it is impossible to do so with advantage. One may hear the clinique to be sure, and a very good one too; but he cannot see the patients. This, especially in my present situation, is the most important by far. My great object is to accustom my ear to stethoscopic sounds; in order to this I must see the patients. The...
Page 25 - ... again from Paris. It is now the first moment of my life, that I have heen placed between two duties, each strong, each binding, and where my difficulty is to decide which is the most so. But I have decided, — as I know, against your wishes. God grant that circumstances may be such that you shall accord with me, when the time is passed. A medical man has his duties; — I am a boy in medicine; — granted. But I am like the other Americans here about me. An opportunity is offered us of studying...
Page 21 - ... which would prevent his devoting himself, for many years, exclusively to observation. But are these difficulties insurmountable ? Must we compel ourselves to believe that a man, whom nature has peculiarly qualified for observation, cannot be permitted to exercise the peculiar talents bestowed upon him ? For my own part, I cannot admit the belief. I hope and trust that the difficulties, of which Mr. Jackson has spoken, will disappear. Let us suppose that he should pass four more years without...
Page 130 - As soon as tuberculous matter is 17 deposited, there exists a solid material around the bronchia, which will transmit the sound made by the passage of the air through these tubes; — but thus early a great portion of the lung, even in the part affected, (the summit,) is permeable to the air; and therefore the murmur of vesicular expansion, on inspiration, entirely masks the sound of the air passing through the bronchia, which would otherwise have been transmitted through the surrounding denser medium....
Page 61 - He noted also the age, occupation, residence and manner of living of the patient; likewise any accidents which had occurred, and which might have influenced the disease then affecting him. He ascertained also, as much as possible, the diseases which had occurred in the family of his patient. Secondly, he inquired into the present disease, ascertaining not only what symptoms had marked its commencement, but those which had been subsequently developed and the order of their occurrence; and recording...
Page 20 - I had remarked these characteristics in him, before I knew who he was. Soon afterwards, learning that he would ere long return to Boston, I pointed out to him the advantage it would be for science and for himself, if he would devote several years exclusively to the observation of diseases. I now retain the same opinion and am strengthened in it; for the more I become acquainted with, and the more I notice him applying himself to observation, the more am I persuaded that he is fitted to render real...

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