A Memoir of Lewis David Von Schweinitz, with a Sketch of His Scientific Labours: Read Before the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, 1835

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1835 - 38 pages
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Page 4 - or Moravian Brethren in North America. His mother was Dorothea Elizabeth de Watteville, daughter of Baron, afterwards Bishop, John de Watteville, and of Benija, who was a daughter of Count Zinzendorf. Of the last mentioned ancestor, it may not, for reasons which will appear in the sequel, be inappropriate to make a passing' reminiscence. Nicholas Lewis, Count Zinzendorf, was born at Dresden, in 1700, and was celebrated in his youth for forming religious societies, six or seven of which are said...
Page 26 - Triehoderma rotcum, furnished with curious and delicate little filaments, was nothing more than a zoophyte, with six arms. Against these, and many similar heresies and hallucinations, the authors do not fail to caution their readers. This work was prepared under several disadvantages. The German writers on cryptogamia had, it is true, been found of great service in determining nice and difficult questions, and to them Albertini and Schweinitz repeatedly acknowledged their obligations ; but they had...
Page 14 - ... patriotic feeling which cheered the heart, and buoyed up the hopes of Mr. Schweinitz, in the near prospect of extensive usefulness in the land of his nativity. .The immediate scene of his duties was the establishment at Salem, Stokes county, North Carolina, where amidst the secular and ecclesiastical duties of his office, he found time to prosecute the study of botany, in a dominion, scientifically speaking, all his own.
Page 7 - ... of his faculties. It was, moreover, on the side of his mother that he was related to Watteville and Zinzendorf; hence, we may readily suppose that from this source he derived the partiality for addressing to his friends short speeches and little sermons...
Page 25 - Lusatia," the authors have, with becoming spirit, discarded the too frequent practice of writers in changing the names of plants, and adopting new synonyms, merely, as would often appear, to compel future naturalists to cite their own names in connection with the trivial specific appellations which they choose to affix to well known objects. This course they avoided under the conviction that natural history had received, and was daily receiving, great detriment from the accumulation and confusion...
Page 27 - Schweinitz was enabled to profit by the contemporary labours of those whom he is pleased to term the coryphaei of mycological science, such as Fries, Nees, Link and Kunz, and he then takes occasion to remark, that all the genera described by them are likewise found in America, and that indeed but few species are known in Europe, (except those parasitic fungi which belong to a matrix not here produced,) but what are equally the products of both continents. This seemed conclusively to refute the notion...
Page 17 - This incident is mentioned only as indicative of the feelings and dispositions of the man. The voyage this year undertaken, was with a purpose similar to that of 1818, and on both occasions he exercised on the deliberations of his brethren at Herrnhut a decided and salutary influence. During his absence from the country his paper on the new American species of...
Page 9 - ... of the school, attracted his attention, and led to a few observations on its name and physiology. From this mo,ment he dated his own partiality for the beauties of the vegetable kingdom. When his abode was afterwards fixed at the school, and he enjoyed the advantage of some instructions in the elements of botany from one of the teachers* in the seminary, he pursued his researches in this delightful science with the most enthusiastic ardour. He...
Page 11 - Scarcely any important topic in the wide field of science, escaped his notice, and especially did the constitution and management of the affairs of his social and religious fraternity, call forth from his pen many able and spirited articles.
Page 14 - A journal kept on this voyage manifests, however, the fervent and patriotic feeling which cheered the heart, and buoyed up the hopes of Mr. Schweinitz, in the near prospect of extensive usefulness in the land of his nativity. .The immediate scene of his duties was the establishment at Salem, Stokes county, North Carolina, where...

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