A Memoir of Mr. John Lowell, Jun: Delivered as the Introduction to the Lectures on His Foundation, in the Odeon, 31st December, 1839; Repeated in the Marlborough Chapel, 2d January, 1840

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C.C. Little and J. Brown, 1840 - Botanists - 74 pages
 

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Page 24 - Lo wndes, it was advocated by Mr. Calhoun, and was incorporated into the law of 1816. To this provision of law, the fruit of the intelligence and influence of Mr. Lowell, New England owes that branch of industry which has made her amends for the diminution of her foreign trade ; which has kept her prosperous under the exhausting drain of her population to the West ; which has brought a market for his agricultural produce to the farmer's door ; and which, while it has conferred these blessings on...
Page 65 - The object of his bequest, as set forth in his will, is "the maintenance and support of public lectures, to be delivered in Boston, upon philosophy, natural history, the arts and sciences...
Page 24 - He would thus, out of his own produce, be enabled to pay for all the supplies which he required from the north. This simple and conclusive view of the subject prevailed, and determined a portion of the south to throw its weight into the scale in favor of a protective tariff. The minimum duty on cotton fabrics, the corner stone of the system, was proposed by Mr.
Page 68 - ... the statesmen, the legislators, the friends of man, — it is all a dreary blank. Not one bright name is preserved in their history ; not one great or generous deed, if ever performed, has escaped from oblivion ; not a word, ever uttered or written by the myriads of rational beings, the lords or the subjects of this mighty empire, has been embalmed in the memory of mankind. A beam of light from the genius of a modern French scholar, cast upon the sculptured sides of obelisks and temples, has...
Page 72 - Europe, published in the Monthly Anthology, display the extent and accuracy of his observation, and the vigor of his style. After three years spent in Europe, he returned to America, and passed the residue of his life as a private citizen, without resuming his professional pursuits, or accepting any public office. He took, however, an active part in the political controversies of the day, and exercised a powerful influence over public opinion. Those party divisions which had their origin in the French...
Page 36 - ... short, the variety of flowers is greater than that of the prairies in the Western States of America, though I think their number is less. Our Rudbeckia is, I think, more beautiful than the chrysanthemum coronarium which you see all over Sicily ; but there are the orange and the lemon." After a month passed in Sicily, Mr Lowell crossed to Malta. Here he had so far altered the original plan of his route, that he determined to make the tour of Greece before visiting Asia Minor. Accordingly, after...
Page 25 - Lowell; and in conferring his name upon the noble city of the arts in our neighborhood, a monument not less appropriate than honorable has been reared to his memory. What memorial of a great public benefactor so becoming as the bestowal of his name on a prosperous community, which has started, as it were, from the soil at the touch of his wand ? Pyramids ' and mausoleums may crumble to...
Page 18 - The power-loom, although it had been for some time invented in England, was far less used in that country, in proportion to the quantity of cotton spun, than at the present day, and was wholly unknown in the United States. After deliberation, the enterprise was resolved upon. A model of a common loom was procured by Mr. Lowell and his friend, — both equally ignorant of the...
Page 66 - ... and chemistry, with their application to the arts ; also, on botany, zoology, geology, and mineralogy, connected with their particular utility to man. " After the establishment of these courses of lectures, should disposable funds remain, or, in process of time, be accumulated, the trustee may appoint courses of lectures to be delivered on the literature and eloquence of our language, and even on those of foreign nations, if he see fit. He may, also, from time to time, establish lectures on any...
Page 2 - WARE, in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the District of Massachusetts. STEREOTYPED AT THE BOSTON TYPE AND STEREOTYPE FOUNDRY.

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