A Method of English Composition

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Ginn, Heath & Company, 1885 - English language - 96 pages
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Page 33 - Subduct from any phenomenon such part as is known by previous inductions to be the effect of certain antecedents, and the residue of the phenomenon is the effect of the remaining antecedents.
Page 19 - The style of Dryden is capricious and varied ; that of Pope is cautious and uniform. Dryden observes the motions of his own mind ; Pope constrains his mind to his own rules of composition. Dryden is sometimes vehement and rapid ; Pope is always smooth, uniform, and gentle.
Page 97 - MINTO. A Manual of English Prose Literature, Biographical and Critical : designed mainly to show Characteristics of Style. By W. MINTO, MA, Professor of Logic in the University of Aberdeen. Third Edition, revised. Crown 8vo, 7s. 6d. Characteristics of English Poets, from Chaucer to Shirley. New Edition, revised. Crown 8vo, 7s. 6d.
Page 110 - A Midsummer Night's Dream. The Merchant of Venice. Much Ado about Nothing. As You Like It.
Page 108 - Hudson's Expurgated Shakespeare. For Schools, Clubs, and Families. Revised and enlarged Editions of twenty-three Plays. Carefully expurgated, with explanatory Notes at the bottom of the page, and Critical Notes at the end of each volume. By HN HUDSON, LL.D., Editor of The Harvard Shakespeare.
Page 66 - The getting of treasures by a lying tongue is a vanity tossed to and fro of them that seek death.
Page 104 - Shakespeare with an old edition made in 1851 and still sold by another house. is pre-eminently the edition for libraries, students, and general readers. The type, paper, and binding are attractive and superior, and the introductions and notes represent the editor's ripest thought.
Page 107 - Art, discussing under this head, Nature and Use of Art, Principles of Art, Dramatic Composition, Characterization, Humour, Style, Moral Spirit.
Page 20 - The style of Dryden is capricious and varied; that of Pope is cautious and uniform. Dryden obeys the motions of his own mind; Pope constrains his mind to his own rules of composition. Dryden is sometimes vehement and rapid; Pope is always smooth, uniform, and gentle. Dryden's page is a natural field, rising into inequalities, and diversified by the varied exuberance of abundant vegetation; Pope's is a velvet lawn, shaven by the scythe, and levelled by the roller.
Page 106 - Professor Dowden : Hudson's edition takes its place beside the best work of English Shakespeare students.

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