A Morning After War: C.S. Lewis and WWI

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Peter Lang, 2005 - Literary Criticism - 225 pages
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A Morning After War fills a critical gap in C. S. Lewis biographies with unprecedented detail by tracing Lewis’s wartime service, relationships, and earliest publications. Probing war’s traumatic destruction upon Lewis’s romantic expectations of tranquil life, this book surpasses literary analyses of Lewis’s work by asserting a comprehensive definition of war literature. Equally, scholars and students of World War I, war literature, trauma studies, and C. S. Lewis will find this work an invaluable reassessment of central assumptions in their fields. Not least, here finally is the young C. S. Lewis preceding his usual and often idolized personas.
 

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Contents

Introduction
3
Optimisms Demise
13
z A Prospect of
19
j Model Trenches
31
a Preparing a Defense
47
j Friendship and the Front
55
What Homer Wrote About
71
Respite and Reflection
89
Man and Mouse
101
a The Power Who Slays
113
x The Angel of Pain
131
a Embedded Fragments
155
iz Reluctant Confessions
177
ij The Beauty That Has Been
189
ij A Morning After War
203
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About the author (2005)

The Author: K. J. Gilchrist, Senior Lecturer in English at Iowa State University in Ames, Iowa, teaches and publishes on modern and contemporary British literature, World War I, and Shakespeare. He developed and directs the course WWI and Modern Culture , which he teaches in England, France, and Belgium. Dr. Gilchrist received his Ph.D. from the University of Kansas, writing on WWI and the early novels of Evelyn Waugh. His work on A Morning After War was assisted by the Clyde S. Kilby Research Grant for 2003.

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