A Narrative of the Campaign in Russia, During the Year 1812

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, 1814 - Europe - 434 pages
 

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Page 10 - His Majesty caused the following proclamation to be inserted in the Orders of the Army : " SOLDIERS ! — The second war of Poland \ has commenced. The first was brought to a close at Friedland and Tilsit. At Tilsit, Russia swore eternal alliance with France, and war with England. She now violates her oaths. She refuses to give...
Page 34 - Church! you have in all circumstances by your intercession called down upon our empire the Divine protection! Russian people! intrepid posterity of Slavonians! it is not the first time that you have plucked out the teeth from the head of the lion, who sprung on you as upon a prey, and met his own destruction! Unite yourselves! carry the cross in your hearts and the sword in your hands, and human force never can prevail against you. I...
Page 42 - Soldiers, while we thus call you to the field of honour, we exhort, we supplicate you never to forget that it is also the field of justice. Abstain from all actions unworthy your great cause. Abhor every disorder or license that would bring down on your heads the wrath of a Being who is not more the God of retribution than the God of mercy. We recommend to you the love of your neighbour, and the love of concord, &c.
Page 42 - ... armies. Fortify , by the words of truth, men of feeble minds, whom ignorance exposes to the artifices of imposture. Instruct every order, both by precept and action, to respect, above all things, their faith and their country. And should one of the sons of the priesthood, who may not have...
Page 372 - Heaven itself appeared to hurl its last bolt upon their sacrilegious heads, by increasing the cold to a degree that was almost intolerable to the best defended ; but to those who had no covering it was suffering worse than the tortures of the rack. " It was at this crisis, when nearly deprived of the power of moving, they abandoned their guns, baggage, and arms, and throwing themselves upon the drifting snowa, called on the blast to end their miseries.
Page 361 - The horrors which it details, and the sufferings which were endured, were so great as to render all exaggeration impossible ; and, therefore, we here give our author credit for fidelity of representation. " The instant the work" (meaning the bridge) " was passable, the impatient Emperor of the French ordered over a sufficient number of his guards to render the way tolerably safe from immediate molestation ; and the moment that was ascertained, he followed with his suite and principal generals, a...
Page 151 - Thus closed that memorable day, and with it terminated the lives of EIGHTY THOUSAND human beings. — The horses which lay on the ground from right to left, numbered full 25,000.
Page 161 - was entered by the enemy on the 15th September; at this intelligence it might be expected that consternation would appear on every countenance ; but far from us be such pusillanimity. Rather let us swear to redouble our perseverance and our resolution ; let us hope, that fighting in a just cause, we shall hurl back upon the enemy all the evil with which he seeks to overwhelm us. Moscow, indeed, is occupied by French troops ; it has not become theirs in consequence of their having destroyed our armies...
Page 206 - The demon of destruction was let loose to satiate itself with human misery. The soldiers of the camp and of the town rushed from all quarters to pursue their devastating task. Nothing was to be spared ; neither church, nor palace, nor private dwelling, was to be left unsacked, undestroyed. The foundling hospital alone (having been made the asylum of the French sick, and which now contained several thousand of the wounded soldiers) was to be exempt from the torch of annihilation." " It is not possible...

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