A National Bank, Or No Bank: An Appeal to the Common Sense of the People of the United States, Especially of the Laboring Classes

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W. E. Dean, 1842 - Electronic book - 104 pages
 

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Page 53 - We admit, as all must admit, that the powers of the government are limited, and that its limits are not to be transcended. But we think the sound construction of the constitution must allow to the national legislature that discretion, with respect to the means by which the powers it confers are to be carried into execution, which will enable that body to perform the high duties assigned to it, in the manner most beneficial to the people.
Page 52 - After the most deliberate consideration, it is the unanimous and decided opinion of this court that the act to incorporate the Bank of the United States is a law made in pursuance of the constitution, and is a part of the supreme law of the land.
Page 53 - States is a law made in pursuance of the constitution:" "but," say they, "where the law is not prohibited, and is really calculated to effect any of the objects entrusted to the government, to undertake here to inquire into the degree of its necessity would be to pass the line which circumscribes the judicial department, and to tread on legislative ground.
Page 53 - Should Congress, in the execution of its powers, adopt measures which are prohibited by the Constitution; or should Congress, under the pretext of executing its powers, pass laws for the accomplishment of objects not intrusted to the government, it would become the painful duty of this tribunal, should a case requiring such a decision come before it, to say that such an act was not the law of the land.
Page 53 - But were its necessity less apparent, none can deny its being an appropriate measure ; and if it is, the degree of its necessity, as has been very justly observed, is to be discussed in another place. Should Congress, in the execution of its powers, adopt measures which are prohibited by the Constitution ; or should Congress, under the pretext of executing its powers, pass laws for the accomplishment of objects not...
Page 53 - ... the nation. Under the confederation. Congress justifying the measure by its necessity, transcended, perhaps, its powers to obtain the advantage of a bank ; and our own legislation attests the universal conviction of the utility of this measure.
Page 89 - In the mouth of the foolish is a rod of pride : but the lips of the wise shall preserve them. 4 Where no oxen are, the crib is clean : but much increase is by the strength of the ox.
Page 29 - ... all duties, imports, and excises shall be uniform throughout the United States.
Page 84 - Gazette, eo that they may be in force from the 21st day of July. Diagrams illustrative of the above plan, and instructions as to the proper mode of fitting the lights, will be furnished to parties applying for them. LIGHT-HOUSE ON LAKE SUPERIOR. By an Act of Congress, approved by the President of the United States July 15th, 1848, the Secretary of the Treasury is authorized "(if he deem it expedient) to change...
Page 3 - purposes", statutes sometimes are explicit as to the matters which are to be taken into consideration in coming to a decision as to the...

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