A Natural History of the British Lepidoptera: A Text-book for Students and Collectors, Volume 3

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S. Sonnenschein, 1902 - Lepidoptera
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Page 287 - Ceratocampidae, although none of the latter spin a cocoon. During the evolution of the group they underwent a change in shape, from a rather long and slender form to a thick heavy body, with a thin integument, the result perhaps of an unusually stationary mode of life. The imagines also underwent a process of degeneration, as seen in the atrophy, total or partial, of the maxillae, and in the loss of veins in their very large but weak wings; though the loss of strength of flight is somewhat compensated...
Page 301 - The extent of approximation towards the male parent depends on the relative phylogenetic age of the two species ; the older being able to transmit its properties, whether of structure or habit, better than the younger.
Page 236 - Ta\*iwrii7<ruco" jection answering the purpose in Hepialida?, Megalovi'stitfJsof'four mire PJSe> Zeuzera, and in Datana.* See also the spine •nd 'thermistor**' on *ne ^iea-& of Sesia tipuliformis (Fig. 578). The imago of the attacine moths cuts or saws through its cocoon by means of a pair of large, stout, black spines (sectores coconis), one on each side of the thorax at the base of the fore wings (Fig. 591), and provided with five or six teeth on the cutting edge (C, D).
Page 274 - ... side, and are about twice as large as the 2d and 3d thoracic ones, and bear twelve bristles. These tubercles and those of the same series on the 9th abdominal segment are much larger than the intermediate ones. There is a slight differentiation in size and color of the dorsal tubercles, those of the thoracic and 9th abdominal segments being of the same size, and larger than those on abdominal segments 1 to 7, and also of a deeper yellow shade. The bristles are pale, those on all the thoracic...
Page 306 - ... the superfamily Bombyces. And here an interesting problem in zoogeography occurs. Are the species of Saturnia (in the restricted sense) — three in Europe, and two in the Southwest and Pacific Coast of North America, occurring where the Attacinae do not exist at all. or only rarely — the relics of a Saturnian fauna from which the group Attacinae has been eliminated by geological extinction, as the sequoia, cypress, magnolia, and other Tertiary plants have been rendered extinct in Europe, or...
Page 253 - ... to brown, and it becomes restless until it finds the moss and leaves needful for its retirement and the construction of its cocoon. The cocoon varies in length from 1 inch 4 lines to 1 inch 7 lines, and is of long-elliptical shape, being from 6 to 8 lines in width ; it is composed of an open- worked reticulation of coarse black or black-brown silk threads, with round or broad oval interstices ; the fabric is extremely strong, tough and elastic, covered externally with moss and birch leaves firmly...
Page 275 - Some larvre in stage I with a very broad lateral dark band along the side of the body, some without it; no transverse stripes present, but the head in front is twice banded with dark brown. 3. The 2d and 3d dorsal thoracic tubercles differentiated in stage I, being slightly larger than the abdominal ones. 4. On the suranal plate are two rudimentary tubercles, each bearing a tuft of bristles. 5. The dorsal median tubercle on uromere 8 does not show such marked traces of its double origin as stage...
Page 287 - ... though the loss of strength of flight is somewhat compensated for by the remarkable development of the olfactory organs, or antennae. This family also appears to be a closed type ; viz. none of the higher or more specialized Bombyces appear to have descended from it (unless possibly the Cochliopodidae), the type representing a side branch of the Bombycine tree which late in geological history grew apart, and reached a marked degree of modification, resulting in the possession of adaptive characters...
Page ix - ... children affords the material for sound inductions as to the education of little children, will find much in this book which they need to know. The lay reader will find it hardly less interesting than the technically trained physiologist, though both will find it very suggestive and full of interest. It is not possible within the limits of this notice to enter into the detailed record of these years, especially as Dr. Dearborn has added to the volume a chapter on "inductions...
Page 285 - The development of the wing-scales and their pigment in butterflies and moths," by Alfred Goldsborough Mayer [Published at The Museum, Cambridge, Mass., USA].

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