A New Picture of the Isle of Wight: Illustrated with Thirty-six Plates of the Most Beautiful and Interesting Views Throughout the Island, in Imitation of the Original Sketches, Drawn and Engraved by William Cooke. To which is Prefixed an Introductory Account of the Island, and a Voyage Round Its Coast

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W. Wilson, 1808 - Isle of Wight - 171 pages
 

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Page 119 - Forgive, blest shade, the tributary tear, That mourns thy exit from a world like this ; Forgive the wish that would have kept thee here, And stayed thy progress to the seats of bliss • No more confined to grov'ling scenes of night, No more a tenant pent in mortal clay, Now should we rather hail thy glorious flight, And trace thy journey to the realms of day.
Page 20 - Welcome to a land of rest : Thus the choir of angels sing, As they bear the soul on high, While with hallelujahs ring All the regions of the sky.
Page 49 - Newport soon followed; after which Charles was seized by the army, and carried a prisoner to Hurst castle. In his way thither he met Mr. Worsley, one of the gentlemen who risked his life for him at Carisbrook. Charles wrung his hand with affection, and pulling his watch out of his pocket, gave it to him, saying — This is all my gratitude has to give.
Page 47 - But this liberty was soon abridged : his chaplains and senvants were first taken from him; then his going abroad in the island gave offence; and soon after, his intercourse with any body but those set about him. So solitary was his confinement, during a great part of his time, that, as he was standing one day near the gate of the castle with Sir Philip Warwick, he pointed to an old...
Page 47 - All this severe usage Charles bore with patience and equanimity ; and endeavoured as much as possible to keep his mind employed. He had ever been impressed with serious thoughts of religion, which his misfortunes had now strengthened and confirmed. Devotion, meditation, and reading the Scriptures, were his great consolation. The few books he had brought with him into the castle, were chiefly on religious subjects, or of a serious cast. Among them was Hooker's Ecclesiastical Polity. This book, it...
Page 12 - Where frequent hedge- rows intersect rich fields Of many a different form and different hue, Bright with ripe corn, or green with grass, or dark With clover's purple bloom...
Page 16 - I have heard," says the knight, " and partly know it to be true, that not only heretofore there was no lawyer nor attorney in owre island; but, in Sir George Carey's time, an attorney coming in to settle in the island, was, by his command, with a pound of candles hanging at his...
Page 48 - Clarendon gives us the detail of two of them ; but a third, which he had heard of, he supposes to be a mere fiction. As it is mentioned, however, in the Worsley papers, with every mark of authenticity, and as one of the principal conductors of it was a gentleman of that family, there seems to be little doubt of its being a fact. The following is an abstract of it. " By a correspondence privately settled with some gentlemen in the island, it was agreed, that the king should let himself down by a cord...
Page 49 - ... his apartment. A swift horse, with a guide, was to wait for him at the bottom of the ramparts ; and a vessel in the offing was to be ready to convey him where he pleased.
Page 48 - ... enjoyed at least a fine air, and an extensive prospect ; though every object he saw, the flocks straying carelessly on one side, and the ships sailing freely on the other, put him in mind of that liberty of which he was so cruelly deprived. In the mean time, he was totally careless of his person ; he let his beard and hair grow, and was inattentive to his dress. " During the time of his imprisonment in Carisbrook Castle,, three attempts were made, chiefly by the gentlemen of the island, to rescue...

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