A new treatise of arithmetick and book-keeping ...: The whole illustrated with two set of books filled with examples of fictitious trade, such as may, and does most ordinarly [!] occur

Front Cover
Printed by J. Mosman and W. Brown for J. Paton, 1718 - Mathematics - 245 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 26 - In a series of equal ratios, any antecedent is to its consequent, as the sum of all the antecedents is to the sum of all the consequents. Let a: 6 = c: d = e :/. Then, by Art.
Page 47 - In any series of numbers in arithmetical progression, the sum of the two extremes is equal to the sum of any two terms equally distant from them; as in the latter of the above series 6 + 1=4+3, and =5+2.
Page 48 - ... to the sum of the extremes multiplied by half the number of terms. Rule. — Add the extremes together, and multiply their sum by half the number of terms ; the product will be the sum of the series.
Page 93 - T % = li; ff=2To reduce a mixed fraction to an equivalent improper fraction. RULE. — Multiply the whole number by the denominator of the fractional part, and to the product add the numerator, and place their sum over the said denominator.
Page 47 - It also appears from the above, that the sum of the extremes is equal to the sum of any other two terms equally distant from the extremes.
Page 110 - ... divide the numerator and denominator of the dividend by the numerator and denominator of the divisor, and the result will be the same.
Page 52 - General Treatife of. the Dominion of the Sea, and a compleat Body of Sea Laws, 5$ 4867 Gilmour's and.
Page 99 - The reason of this rule may be thus seen : Multiplying the numerator of the multiplicand by the numerator of the multiplier, the product is as many times loo large as there are un;ts in the denominator of the multiplier.
Page 25 - The product of the two extremes in a geometrical progression, is equal to the product of any two terms equidistant from them, or to the square of the middle term when the number of terms is odd.
Page 100 - Write the divisor to the right of the dividend with the sign (-=-) between them ; then multiply the numerator of the dividend by the denominator of the divisor, for the numerator of the quotient, and the denominator of the dividend by the numerator of the divisor, for the denominator of the quotient. Or, invert the divisor, and multiply as in multiplication of fractions. Or, proceed by cancellation, when practicable. EXAMPLES. — Divide...

Bibliographic information